Andrew Wakefield and Lance Armstrong: two unethical people exposed by the Sunday Times

30 Jun

The Sunday Times has a series of films (Unquiet Films, www.foreverunquiet.co.uk) has a series of short films about the impact of The Times has had over the years.

Newspapers are all about stories – but sometimes the best stories are the ones we don’t tell.

Let’s not forget that news is often something that someone, somewhere, doesn’t want you to know. The real-life tales of how world-changing exclusives – whether from foreign reporters under fire, or determined hacks banging against stone-walling bureaucracy – are brought out into the open can be just as extraordinary as the articles that end up in the newspaper. Sometimes the story behind our amazing photo-journalism, campaign to change the law on adoption, to make cities safe for cycling, to reveal the corruption at the heart of FIFA, or the lies of a champion like Lance Armstrong are as exciting as a thriller, as tense as an episode of House of Cards.

We decided it was time to showcase just what the best journalists do… the real lives, real struggles, real bravery behind the newspaper stories that change the course of history. It’s all very well to boast that The Times and the Sunday Times strive to speak truth to power, without fear or favour and to report the truth, whatever the cost. But too often exactly what that takes – the death threats to reporters, the legal battles, the toughness and integrity it takes to get the article on the page – gets lost in the telling.

So here, in a series of extraordinary and independently made short films are some of the amazing, true-life stories behind the stories – we hope you find them as moving and inspiring as we do.

As an example of the “best journalists do”, they have a segment entitled “question everything“. It focuses on Brian Deer (whose work exposed the unethical actions of Andrew Wakefield, later found proved by the GMC) and David Walsh (who pursued and uncovered the Lance Armstrong doping scandal).

From BAFTA-winning filmmaker Will Clark: We now live in a world where more often than not, only the surface facts of a story are reported. Real investigative journalism seems to be a dying art and I feel this is something we should all be deeply concerned about. I wanted to create a film that focused on two Sunday Times journalists whose pursuit for the truth turned into an obsession. From Lance Armstrong’s doping revelations to Andrew Wakefield’s fraudulent MMR claims, both were lengthy investigations that were published at risk by the newspaper. Both investigations also managed to reveal large scandals that would most likely have remained hidden were it not for the perseverance and tenacity of the journalists covering the stories. I’m sure every reporter has secretly wished for his or her very own All The President’s Men moment. This is the tale of two journalists who got their wish.

Here’s the video:


By Matt Carey

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3 Responses to “Andrew Wakefield and Lance Armstrong: two unethical people exposed by the Sunday Times”

  1. lilady July 1, 2014 at 01:13 #

    Excellent post Matt.

    I’ll be using that video clip when I post comments about Andrew Wakefield and his pseudoscience.

  2. Science Mom July 1, 2014 at 01:52 #

    Sheryl Attkisson needs to take a page out of The Times book when it comes to real investigative reporting. She seems to think that the sloppy, paranoid informercials she concocts are investigative reporting worth being made a pariah over.

    • lilady July 1, 2014 at 04:15 #

      Who? Wakefield’s toady…known for taking his press releases and retrofitting/prepackaging them as investigative reporting.

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