Disability Groups Send Recommendations to Obama

16 Jan

I got the below through Ari Ne’eman at ASAN. This is the sort of advocacy I like to see: broad in scope, broad in support. I like seeing Autism organizations working with other disability org’s.

____________________________________

Disability Groups Send Recommendations to Obama

Dear President-elect Obama,

Congratulations on capturing the hearts, minds, and hopes of our nation! As grassroots, community-based, consumer-controlled disability organizations, which collectively represent over 50 million Americans with the full spectrum of disabilities, we look forward to working with you and your administration to make cost-effective policy changes to enhance the lives of and restore the civil liberties Americans with disabilities.

Attached you will find nine summaries of the top policy issues facing Americans with disabilities. Taking action on your commitment and these policy measures will not only benefit citizens with disabilities, our nation’s wounded warriors, and the ever-growing aging population, it will benefit all Americans and save our government millions of dollars as individuals with disabilities become full participants in society.

They include:

· Employment: Reversing the persistently high percentages of people with disabilities who are not working but are ready, willing and able to work;

· Education: Increasing access and opportunities for physical activity, and improving quality;

· Health Care: Improving access and decreasing disparities and inequities;

· Home and Community-based Services (HCBS): Promoting effective community-based services as alternatives to costly nursing homes and other institutions and increase the FMAP to states;

· Disability Research: Promoting a quality of life and participation-based research agenda;

· Civil Rights: Reinvigorating civil rights enforcement, extending access requirements to new technologies, and continuing to restore protections stripped away by hostile courts;

· Human Rights: Protecting human rights of individuals with disabilities at home and abroad;

· Emergency Preparedness, Response and Recovery Needs: Planning, coordinating, and providing resources to support people with disabilities before, during, and after a crisis; and

· Genetic Science and Technology: Promoting ethical use of new technologies.

Like you, we stand and sit on the shoulders of so many who have come before us. As our nation approaches the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 2010, we embrace the disability rights principle, “Nothing About Us, Without Us.” For too long others claimed the need to speak for us, but no other group – professionals or relatives – speak for us.

Additionally, we urge you to embrace the fundamental principles for sustainable change, which are essential elements to building healthy, resilient, empowered communities. As you move forward with deliberate speed and consideration, we urge your administration to:

· Provide oversight of federal agency public policy, regulatory, and enforcement actions, and collaborate with consumer and community-based disability organizations as partners to better serve the ever-expanding population of more than 50 million Americans with disabilities;

· Hire qualified professionals with disabilities, who have expertise in policy areas, throughout the administration, including a Special Assistant to the President on Disability Policy;

· Include individuals with disabilities in policy formation in all areas addressed by the administration, and integrate representatives of our community on all advisory boards of all major agencies;

· Provide services that serve people with disabilities across the life span, from cradle to grave, and all those with increased needs for health care, health promotion, and long-term services and community-based supports;

· Incorporate consumer-directed services and include consumers in policy development;

· Embrace the disability experience as part of culturally competent policy and diversity at all levels of planning, policy formulation, implementation, and evaluation; and

· Focus on “universal design” as a cost-effective innovative way to enhance the quality of life and level of participation of all Americans in community life and incorporate it into infrastructure changes in the economic stimulus package so we upgrade the infrastructure for all to use;

Thank you for your support of the need for the federal government to be “diligent about making sure the states enforce the rights affirmed by the Olmstead decision.” Enabling people with disabilities to live independently in their own homes and communities, rather than being forced into costly Medicaid-funded nursing homes and other institutions will ensure civil liberties, enhance the quality of life and full participation of all Americans by creating stronger, sustainable communities of inclusion and acceptance to honor the 10th Anniversary of the Olmstead decision.

As a community of individuals with disabilities, we ask for nothing more than what other Americans expect and already have. We seek inclusion. We seek a voice for the disability rights message in the change you create. As you create more jobs for Americans, include jobs for Americans with disabilities. As you improve education for America’s students, include students with disabilities. As you improve the healthcare system, include the healthcare needs of individuals with disabilities. As you restore civil rights to Americans, include the civil rights of individuals with disabilities. To paraphrase your now immortal words, – We are not a nation of disabled and non-disabled Americans. We are the United States of America.

We stand ready to work with you and look forward to an opportunity to discuss our priorities with you personally in the coming months.

Sincerely,

American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)

Access Living

American Disabled for Attendant Programs Today (ADAPT)

Autistic Self Advocacy Network

Boston Center for Independent Living (BCIL)

California Foundation for Independent Living Centers (CFILC)

Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund (DREDF)

Generations Ahead

Little People of America

Metro-West Center for Independent Living (MWCIL)

National Association of the Deaf (NAD)

National Coalition for Disability Rights (NCDR)

National Coalition of Mental Health Consumer Survivor Organizations

National Council on Independent Living (NCIL)

National Empowerment Center

National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Self Advocates Becoming Empowered (SABE)

Special Olympics

Texas State Independent Living Council (TX SILC)

World Institute on Disability (WID)

For Policy Recommendations on each policy issue click links above


Ari Ne’eman
President
The Autistic Self Advocacy Network
1660 L Street, NW, Suite 700
Washington, DC 20036
http://www.autisticadvocacy.org
732.763.5530

37 Responses to “Disability Groups Send Recommendations to Obama”

  1. farmwifetwo January 16, 2009 at 15:03 #

    Education is the one I laugh at…. If the neurodiverse crowd doesn’t want a “cure” and doesn’t want people with autism to be expected to become more than they might wish to be… Why would they want “education”??

    That’s my complaint. I’m so tired of the “we want to be”, “we are”, “we don’t want to change”, “we expect to be accommodated”…. but where’s the “we’ll try our best”, “we’ll be interested in getting help with communication issues, sensory issues, OCD issues, social issues”.. there’s no meeting the rest of society half way.. It’s all “Me, Me, Me”.

    Education is changing, education is learning, education is becoming/doing/acting/taking part in… more than you thought you could be.

    Education is becoming “cured” so one can be an independant, contributing member of society.

    I distrust both the “cure” crowd and the “neurodiverse” crowd. One wants something that’s unattainable and one is afraid of growth and change.

    I also find it interesting that the “neurodiverse” crowd doesn’t have members with autism in it that are independant/contributing members of society… why’s that???

    S.

  2. alyric January 16, 2009 at 15:20 #

    “there’s no meeting the rest of society half way.. It’s all “Me, Me, Me”.”

    What utter nonsense. Since when has society leant even fractionally towards accommodating spectrumites in any way.

    Thank you for getting the concept of neurodiversity all wrong. Since when is ‘education’ a cure? Are you saying that education can change the neural configuration? What utter nonsense again, though it would be nice to cure a lot of people of lots of things if all you needed was education.

  3. Kev January 16, 2009 at 15:25 #

    Uh, I think you’re either reading something into ND blogs that isn’t there or not reading enough. Not sure which. How is not wanting to be not ‘cured’ synonymous with not wanting to be educated or be better through education?

  4. jon Mitchell January 16, 2009 at 18:22 #

    “How is not wanting to be not ‘cured’ synonymous with not wanting to be educated or be better through education?”

    Easy, Kev, without a cure or some really revolutionary treatment that will allow a person with autism to function at a near proper level, they will never be able to learn as well as someone without the impairment. They won’t be able to pay attention as well, they won’t be able to study as well. They won’t be doctors or lawyers or dentists, etc. Certainly I don’t know of any persons with autism in those professions, except for a few ph.ds who are at the very highest end of the spectrum.

    This is in spite of the bizarre stereotypes that alyric and people like he/she harbor about autistics having good attention to detail.

    I know this from my own personal experience as someone with mild autism who barely graduated college and could not become a brain researcher or even some other desirable profession due to my inability to get a good education without a cure. You certainly don’t know this from personal experience not being on the spectrum and I doubt alyric understands this either.

  5. Joseph January 16, 2009 at 19:28 #

    Education is the one I laugh at…. If the neurodiverse crowd doesn’t want a “cure” and doesn’t want people with autism to be expected to become more than they might wish to be… Why would they want “education”??

    That is an absolutely ridiculous question. Say you have an NT child. You obviously don’t want to “cure” them of being NT. You probably also accept them as they are. Does this mean you don’t send them to school because you accept them? You just let them do whatever they want.

    In no context are acceptance and education at odds with one another. This has never been the case.

  6. Socrates January 16, 2009 at 19:34 #

    Jon

    to function at a near proper level

    Have a look at the DSM. It’s overwhelmingly a manual of disorders of the Neurotypical Normal.

    1% of everyone in schizophrenic

    1% have BPAD

    1% have an ASC

    God knows how many have personality disorders – 10%?

    Your “Normal” is a notional “Normal” that doesn’t actually exist. I think you underestimate the difficulties in life for many NT’s.

    There are lonely, unemployed NT’s, you know.

    There’s legions of frustrated NT scientists and musicians. People not fortunate to be born with exactly the talents they need or the right circumstances to flourish.


    “You certainly don’t know this from personal experience not being on the spectrum”

    And I doubt you have much idea of the challenges of life with BPAD. I doubt many people would trade autism for manic-depression.

    Cheap shot J.

  7. Joseph January 16, 2009 at 19:47 #

    Actually, Jon sounds quite “normal” if you will. Most people barely graduate college, and are unable to become brain researchers or some other “desirable profession.”

  8. jon Mitchell January 16, 2009 at 20:31 #

    well joseph i am currently in no profession. I am unemployed and have been for nearly two years, so i am in the bottom 30th percentile of the 70% of all autistics you claim are able to work, with those statistics that you cite which I still don’t understand how you obtained them or where they come from

  9. alyric January 16, 2009 at 21:15 #

    Since when is attention to detail a bizarre stereotype,even if it’s only half true?

    I challenge deal jon to produce a citation for it? Highly doubtful he will and he avoids Mottron’s work so he doesn’t learn anything new that might keep his steretypes accurate.

  10. Kassiane January 16, 2009 at 21:49 #

    Gosh, farmwife, nice strawmen you’re beating up.

    Lots of autistic people have jobs. Including the ND community. The idea of education that works with our strengths rather than trying to make us pale imitation NTs is to allow us to function the best we can as happy healthy autistic US.

    Is that REALLY so hard to understand?

  11. Socrates January 16, 2009 at 22:45 #

    “The idea of education that works with our strengths rather than trying to make us pale imitation NTs is to allow us to function the best we can as happy healthy autistic US.”

    And this fundamental point is what is missing from current mainstream thinking across the world.

    I’ve just come across a training course for autistics,…., in retail.

    I mean, take an autistic and put them in a highly dynamic and unpredictable environment where social skills are at the forefront…

    But it does involve selling computers, so that’s ok, they’ve read the first 12 pages of a Twattwood book, they’ve got their hook and their USP. I bet it looks great on the funding application…

  12. jon Mitchell January 16, 2009 at 23:10 #

    I don’t need a citation, alyric i have my own life and life’s experiences as well as others who have autism. Mottron’s work mostly involves high functioning autistics who are not typical of most autistics. For more on that topic, you might be interested in reading my recent take in autism’s gadfly on michelle dawson’s wechsler versus raven’s matrices study which I have now read. These were clearly atypical autistics. It is likely that mottron’s other studies involved likewise other atypical autistics.

  13. Socrates January 16, 2009 at 23:22 #

    Jon,

    Sing with me will you?

    Some things in life are bad
    They can really make you mad
    Other things just make you swear and curse.
    When you’re chewing on life’s gristle
    Don’t grumble, give a whistle
    And this’ll help things turn out for the best…

    And…always look on the bright side of life…
    Always look on the light side of life…

    If life seems jolly rotten
    There’s something you’ve forgotten
    And that’s to laugh and smile and dance and sing.
    When you’re feeling in the dumps
    Don’t be silly chumps
    Just purse your lips and whistle – that’s the thing.

    And…always look on the bright side of life…
    Always look on the light side of life…

    For life is quite absurd
    And death’s the final word
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.
    Forget about your sin – give the audience a grin
    Enjoy it – it’s your last chance anyhow.

    So always look on the bright side of death
    Just before you draw your terminal breath

    Life’s a piece of shit
    When you look at it
    Life’s a laugh and death’s a joke, it’s true.
    You’ll see it’s all a show
    Keep ’em laughing as you go
    Just remember that the last laugh is on you.

    And always look on the bright side of life…
    Always look on the right side of life…
    (Come on guys, cheer up!)
    Always look on the bright side of life…
    Always look on the bright side of life…
    (Worse things happen at sea, you know.)
    Always look on the bright side of life…
    (I mean – what have you got to lose?)
    (You know, you come from nothing – you’re going back to nothing.
    What have you lost? Nothing!)
    Always look on the right side of life…

  14. Billy Cresp January 17, 2009 at 00:40 #

    Kassiane, about what percentage of autistic people have jobs? How many are able to get and hold jobs? What if many autistics just don’t have enough strengths to acquire even a basic education?

    It doesn’t make sense for someone to claim to care about a goal such as education, while demonizing ways to ensure its possibility such as a cure to remove the mental impairments that preclude a lot of learning, unless such a person doesn’t care how little education is attained as long as something is learned, considering even just mentioning education as a goal sounds nice.

    I’m sick of these sneaky ways to distract from the realization that the impairments prevalent in most autistics preclude lots of functioning. And the alternatives to what you want done aren’t necessarily to turn autistics into imitation NTs.

  15. Socrates January 17, 2009 at 00:49 #

    The NAS Prospects Employment Agency got a very high proportion of high-functioning autistic people in to mainstream work.

  16. Joseph January 17, 2009 at 01:48 #

    It doesn’t make sense for someone to claim to care about a goal such as education, while demonizing ways to ensure its possibility such as a cure to remove the mental impairments that preclude a lot of learning, unless such a person doesn’t care how little education is attained as long as something is learned, considering even just mentioning education as a goal sounds nice.

    What doesn’t make sense is suggesting that education is only a possibility if there’s a cure. Unless someone is in a comma, they can be educated one way or another, be it through mainstream education or special education.

    The myth of the cure that might someday be found at some point in the future is helpful to education how exactly?

  17. Billy Cresp January 17, 2009 at 02:09 #

    Joseph, how little of an amount of education do you consider enough to settle for? I think it’s disingenuous to say one cares about education, when they would be satisfied if the person to be educated only learned very little, and not enough to have a complete basic education. Nothing less than that complete education should be hoped for.

    This really isn’t complicated. Not all people have the ability to learn enough to attain a basic education. I hope for a cure that would get rid of mental impairments, including the intellectual ones, so that the person receiving the cure will have the ability to learn enough to acquire at least a basic education.

  18. Joseph January 17, 2009 at 02:58 #

    @Billy: So in your view education is not worth it or not really important when a person has intellectual disabilities? That’s what it sounds like.

    What about education of, say, persons with Down Syndrome? Is it basically the same whether they receive it or not?

    I hope for a cure that would get rid of mental impairments, including the intellectual ones, so that the person receiving the cure will have the ability to learn enough to acquire at least a basic education.

    And I hope for the day the aging process is finally reversed.

  19. Billy Cresp January 17, 2009 at 03:09 #

    Joseph, education should still be pursued to whatever extent possible for anyone. But there’s no reason to settle there.

  20. Sullivan January 17, 2009 at 05:12 #

    It doesn’t make sense for someone to claim to care about a goal such as education, while demonizing ways to ensure its possibility such as a cure to remove the mental impairments that preclude a lot of learning, unless such a person doesn’t care how little education is attained as long as something is learned, considering even just mentioning education as a goal sounds nice.

    This paragraph makes so little sense you are lucky anyone has taken the time to address it. Sorry to put it so bluntly, but it makes no sense.

    Partly, and only partly, it is a continuation of the same old tired strawman arguments that if one doesn’t support biomed, they aren’t supporting advancing the abilities of autistics.

    One can also discuss how it is impossible to “ensure the possibility of a cure” if a cure is not possible. I am not saying it is impossible, but it one can not “ensure the possibility”.

    There is absolutely no way one can move from your introduction to “unless such a person doesn’t care how little education is attained as long as something is learned”. The logic just isn’t there.

  21. Billy Cresp January 17, 2009 at 06:11 #

    Sullivan, I am not impressed by your condescending attitude. I have not used strawmen arguments, and other opponents of yours haven’t really done so either. Stop trying to back away from having your intentions revealed while simultaneously sticking up for your intentions so boldly.

    If you do nothing but arrogantly bash the concept of not only biomed, but stronger therapies to be devised, and pretend that cure doesn’t matter and that enough can be done already, then I can’t come to any other conclusion besides that you don’t want to advance autistic abilities, because there really aren’t other ways to increase ability significantly for all autistics. Existing therapies do not go far enough. I strongly doubt that you aren’t aware of that. One cannot be in favor of or neutral about doing something that they oppose pursuing.

    The point I’m trying to make is that I think it’s ridiculous for you all to pretend to be so caring in calling for education as a priority, as if special education isn’t already around, and when you know that most autistics have severe impairments and therefore cannot learn enough through education.

    The ones teaching them don’t know what else to do to get them to learn further, and it just may not be possible under their impaired conditions. Many of those teachers try to do what they can do and there is progress sometimes. But who can deny that many autistics will end up without a basic education under these conditions?

    Knowing these realities and results, so called “advocates” shouldn’t pretend they’re doing low-functioning autistics a favor in calling for education, since they are against increasing the intellectual capacity/ability to learn of the low-functioning.

    “There is absolutely no way one can move from your introduction to “unless such a person doesn’t care how little education is attained as long as something is learned”. The logic just isn’t there.” I was trying to explain that favoring only the small amount of education that currently can be attained for autistics, doesn’t make one a proponent for anything more than what is already being done educationally for autistics, and nobody involved in the issue is opposing such education. Just because some education is currently possible, doesn’t mean it’s enough or that autistics want to settle for that small amount. I think making that restricted goal for education a priority for autistic advocacy is very absurd and dismissive. I don’t know how else to explain this. Read my other posts.

  22. Kev January 17, 2009 at 12:39 #

    Billy, jon, fw sorry to be rude but …lol… I thought I’d heard it all but this sparkly new claim that the evil ND don’t want to educate their kids is ridiculous.

    Your theory is that we’re holding our kids back somehow by not wanting a cure because if our kids were cured they’d be able to learn more. Is that right?

    Hate to break this to you but there is no cure. Whilst you find new ways to vent your spleen ill get on with educating my kid. Trouble is, contrary to what Billy thinks education for autistic kids is not already here and just hunky dory. In the UK less than half of autistic kids have access to autism specialist education. If my daughter wants a speech therapist we have wait 3 months for an hours appt. So we try and teach ourselves how to do these things. We teach ourselves PECS and all the other myriad of tools.

    So whilst you talk about utter irrelevances ill carry on educating as best I can and carry on asking for better education. My advice to you in the meantime would be to shut the fuck up you clueless idiots.

  23. RAJ January 17, 2009 at 14:36 #

    “Hate to break this to you but there is no cure”

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19009353?

    Hate to break it to you but recovery and normal functioning does occur. To blindly state there is no cure is a demeaning insult to parents, siblings, family members, special education teachers, speech therapists, occupational therapists.

  24. Socrates January 17, 2009 at 15:10 #

    Residual vulnerabilities affect higher-order communication and attention. Tics, depression and phobias are frequent residual co-morbidities after recovery

    Ummm… Cured? RAJ, did you not read past the first paragraph?

    Possible mechanisms of recovery include: normalizing input by forcing attention outward or enriching the environment; promoting the reinforcement value of social stimuli; preventing interfering behaviors; mass practice of weak skills; reducing stress and stabilizing arousal. Improving nutrition and sleep quality is non-specifically beneficial.

    This process is also know as parenting…

  25. Socrates January 17, 2009 at 15:16 #

    Also and more importantly, if you look at the complete paper, you’ll see that not only is this cure, expressed as

    "recovery"

    That is the authors qualify the cure by calling it a recovery in quotes

    example:

    My dog is cured – he got better

    My dog is “cured” – he died.

  26. Joseph January 17, 2009 at 16:08 #

    There is no cure. There is also loss of label in autism. Both are facts. They are not at odds with one another, and I fail to see why some people think they are.

  27. alyric January 17, 2009 at 17:31 #

    “For more on that topic, you might be interested in reading my recent take in autism’s gadfly on michelle dawson’s wechsler versus raven’s matrices study which I have now read. These were clearly atypical autistics. It is likely that mottron’s other studies involved likewise other atypical autistics.”

    And you knew they were atypical because???

    Jon, I’ll read your bit but you and quite some others I suspect had better be aware of one important datum. Michelle isn’t doing the work she’s doing because she’s autistic even if that’s very helpful. You couldn’t do it, neither could I. She can do it because she’s put in the sheer bloody hard work and thousands of hours that’s required to develop expertise and that only if you have a talent for it. What she is, is an expert, a highly respected expert. You don’t like that well too bad because that’s the reality.

  28. Kev January 17, 2009 at 17:36 #

    Join the idiot group RAJ.

  29. Billy Cresp January 17, 2009 at 17:46 #

    Kev, then why don’t you advocates just specifically call for full educational funding and implementation?
    “Your theory is that we’re holding our kids back somehow by not wanting a cure because if our kids were cured they’d be able to learn more. Is that right?” Yes, why won’t you face such a reality?

    I am not hindering you from educating your child. There are other people who don’t want to settle for the small level of education currently possible through special education, and for the very small improvements available through existing therapies for the lower functioning. There won’t be any cure if you have it your way. Just because it’s a long term goal, doesn’t mean it’s worthless. It’s disturbing to me that I have to explain that to you.

    Someone has to make cure happen. And with the technology out there today, it shouldn’t be ignored as a possibility or be denied funding. A lot of people sure aren’t going to ask you non-disabled ND oppressors for permission to devise a cure. Judging by the defeatist attitudes and overbearing arrogance on part of some of the people who hate cure, they shouldn’t have anything to do with what gets done for severely disabled autistics.

  30. alyric January 17, 2009 at 19:04 #

    “Someone has to make cure happen. And with the technology out there today, it shouldn’t be ignored as a possibility or be denied funding.”

    And what technology would that be?

    A propos of the side discussion with jon, the possibilities for improved education techniques are more likely to rest with people trying to figure out why autistics do relatively better on Raven’s matrices compared to Wechsler. This fictional technological wizardry we’re supposed to have is just pipe dreaming. You shouldn’t fund proposals based on mythology.

  31. Kev January 17, 2009 at 19:25 #

    Kev, then why don’t you advocates just specifically call for full educational funding and implementation?

    What makes you think I don’t? Thing is Billy, thre’s a time and a place. No UK politicians read this blog so I don’t discuss it often here. I do my campaigning as part of my membership of NAS at a local and national level.

    Yes, why won’t you face such a reality?

    Because my fine jackass, its not a reality. Someones functional ability has little to do with how much good education they need. That rests on politicians being persuaded.

    I am not hindering you from educating your child.

    No you foolish boy, you’re claiming *I* am. It worries me I have to explain that to you.

    There are other people who don’t want to settle for the small level of education currently possible through special education, and for the very small improvements available through existing therapies for the lower functioning.

    Count me amongst their number. You need to get a dose of real life Billy. A cure is a long, long, long way off. In the real world, those of us who are parents of severely autistic kids have to deal in the here and now. You carry on pontificating if you like.

    There won’t be any cure if you have it your way. Just because it’s a long term goal, doesn’t mean it’s worthless. It’s disturbing to me that I have to explain that to you.

    Why is it disturbing? Because of your bizarre ideas about education?

    A lot of people sure aren’t going to ask you non-disabled ND oppressors for permission to devise a cure.

    First off, who says I’m ND? Second, of course not – good luck to them. If any scientist wants to pursue that path then they will. You can’t (and shouldn’t) dictate a scientists research interests.

    Judging by the defeatist attitudes and overbearing arrogance on part of some of the people who hate cure, they shouldn’t have anything to do with what gets done for severely disabled autistics.

    Judging by the pity-poor-me ego-whining on part of some of the people who think they know what its like to make choices in the here and now about education, they shouldn’t have anything to do with preaching about education, parenting or anything else they clearly have no hands-on experience with.

    Billy, slap yourself back to reality. Autistic kids of all levels of functioning need appropriate education *now* . Hanging on for a few decades for your ‘cure’ isn’t any ind of answer in the real world.

  32. Billy Cresp January 17, 2009 at 20:04 #

    alyric, I think the technology may involve some types of methods to repair metabolic problems, genetic therapies, maybe stem cell therapies, and probably other things. How dare you call the prospect of such scientific research mythology. Show some respect or else I will assume you are against making things better. I believe a lot will be possible with the things that are being found out about the etiology of autism.

    If technology can be used to make so much other crap possible, it sure should be used for cure. How are more effective educational techniques possible because autistics do relatively better on the Raven’s than on the Weschler?

    “No you foolish boy, you’re claiming I am. It worries me I have to explain that to you.” Kev, stop implying things. I don’t like how you implied that I’m trying to distract your time away from helping your child’s education. Don’t try to push any guilt on me!

    “You need to a dose of real life Billy.” I’ve had more of a dose of that than a lot of you people! You don’t have a damn clue what I’ve been through and had to deal with, and all of the things I did wrong until I figured out what reality was, and had to deal with the regret!

    How do you know how long off a cure is? Think of how much longer it will take if people try to block funding of it and imply it isn’t even wanted? What’s disturbing is that you are insistent on pushing nonsense and phony happiness, while attacking the possibility of making things far better.

    Looking for a cure and ensuring implementation of education aren’t mutually exclusive. Stop with the manipulation. “Hanging on for a few decades for your ‘cure’ isn’t any ind of answer in the real world.” Prove it. Why don’t you ask someone who has stake in the issue if they just want to throw away all hope? What about autistics to be born in the future who could benefit when a cure is devised?

  33. Joseph January 17, 2009 at 23:31 #

    Disabilities are rarely cured, if ever. There’s really no precedent and Alyric is right it’s a pipe dream. Prevention is more likely. For example, Polio is prevented through vaccination. Spina Bifida is prevented with folate supplementation. PKU is prevented with a special diet.

    All that is of course irrelevant to the disabled people who are already here.

    It doesn’t matter if you look at autism using a disease model or a more social model – that’s the current reality of the situation.

  34. Billy Cresp January 18, 2009 at 00:02 #

    Someone should be looking to cure mental disabilities anyway. It’s not impossible. It’s not a pipe dream. I think it’s too comfortable for non-disabled people to be dismissive of the possibility of cure, considering they don’t have to endure being mentally disabled.

  35. Kassiane January 18, 2009 at 02:44 #

    Oh come off it.

    I’m autistic.

    I’m anti cure.

    I want education for everyone. Real education. So we can function, as we are, in society.

    What part of that is so hard to grasp?

  36. Kev January 18, 2009 at 12:38 #

    Billy, how old are you? Late teens? You have no idea what you’re talking about. Literally none. I suggest that your first educative issue is to educate yourself on a vast range of issues. Mostly though, real life.

  37. Molly Assad January 22, 2009 at 18:17 #

    Finding Purpose In Your Pain is an anthology of true testimonies of how God uses all things to work together for good.
    2008 appeared to be a very difficult year for many. It seemed as though financial, marital and health problems were excessive.
    Somehow through the trials many books like “The Secret” were flying of the shelves. People started to become more introspective and draw closer to God because nothing seemed to make sense.
    Help for Autism Inc,Department of State #48693 and tax id #55-0668716, is a non-profit organization devoted to raising funds to provide speech and occupational therapy to autistic children. The organization is sponsoring an essay contest to compile a book of inspiration. To submit a 500 word essay or less please follow these guidelines.
    1) What happened?
    2) How did you get through it?
    3) What is it like now?
    4) What did you learn?

    To submit the essay or pre-order a copy of the book please send your information to helpforautismpr@gmail.com to make a donation RG Bank Account # 1011035134

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: