Sharyl Attkisson didn’t get the memo

28 Jan

Most news reporters understand that vaccines don’t cause autism. One hold out is CBS correspondent Sharyl Attkisson, whose latest story attempts to link a pediatric flu vaccine to autism spectrum disorders.

She bases her report on a recent vaccine safety update from the FDA that notes an uptick in reports of febrile seizures following Fluzone, the only influenza virus vaccine licensed in the US for infants. Fluzone is a “split-virus” vaccine, produced by chemical disruption of the influenza virus, and is incapable of causing influenza.

But Attkisson is having none of that:

More confusing news for parents trying to do the best, safest things for their children when it comes to vaccination.

According to a Vaccine Safety “update” issued by the FDA on Jan. 20, there’s been an increase in reports of febrile seizures among infants and children following this year’s flu vaccine. Febrile seizures are seizures associated with fever.

According to the FDA:

“FDA and CDC have recently detected an increase in the number of reports to VAERS of febrile seizures following vaccination with Fluzone (trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine or TIV, manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur, Inc.). Fluzone is the only influenza vaccine recommended for use for the 2010-2011 flu season in infants and children 6-23 months of age. These reported febrile seizures have primarily been seen in children younger than 2 years of age.”

The FDA says 42 more seizures than usual were reported through Dec. 13; most within a day of the child receiving the flu vaccine. The FDA recommends parents take no action based on this information. They should, the FDA says, continue getting their children vaccinated against flu, as usual. (It should be noted that non-government medical experts differ on the issue of whether flu shots should be given to children.)

The FDA points out that data from VAERS, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, is preliminary and serves as a sign that further investigation is warranted. The maker of the flu vaccine in question, Sanofi Pasteur, has issued a statement saying that no clear link has been established between the flu shot and the seizures, and the cases may be nothing more than coincidence.

Even with “no clear link established,” the mere suggestion of a link may be troubling to parents.

So what’s a biased, scientifically-challenged CBS reporter to do? Create a link that doesn’t exist, in order to scare parents even more!

A new study from the department of Pediatrics and Neurology at the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine discusses how early life seizures “may contribute to the enhanced risk of IDD’s (Intellectual and Development Disabilities) and ASD’s (Autism Spectrum Disorders.)”

Attkisson has either not read the study she cites, does not understand it, or has a very dark agenda. The paper discusses patients with early life seizures and epilepsy. Attkisson gloms on to the findings and applies them, with no credible reason, to the general population.

That’s not the only major fail in this story. The 42 extra cases of febrile seizure reported in the VAERS database do not come close to establishing causality. Instead of telling readers the FDA report is no cause for alarm, Attkisson does the exact opposite:

Even with “no clear link established,” the mere suggestion of a link may be troubling to parents.

Attkisson has been carrying water for the anti-vaccine movement for years. Last September, she mischaracterized the Hannah Poling case as an admission by the US government that vaccines cause autism. And here she is, only a year ago, massaging Andrew Wakefield’s bruised ego.

One major lesson from l’affaire Wakefield is that reporting on scientific research is no small thing, and comes with great responsibility. Dick Ahlstrom, writing in today’s Irish Times, could be speaking directly to Attkisson when he writes:

Balance in journalism generally means presenting both sides of a story, allowing all those involved to state their views. Striking this balance should allow the journalist to remain neutral on the issue. We present the facts and readers form their own opinions on the subject.

But what are facts and how can we know they are true? Achieving balance is supposed to overcome this problem for the journalist – we don’t have to be experts on a subject, we just have to report honestly and accurately on what is said and present the views of both sides, leaving it up to the reader to decide.

Yet achieving that balance can in itself throw a story severely off balance, with reportage on climate change a perfect example. Balance dictates that the reporter should give an equal amount of linage to those who argue that the changes we are seeing in the climate and the persistent warming trends are caused by human activity and to those “climate sceptics” who say it is caused by changes in the sun or other natural phenomena.

Both sides of this argument will present scientific data, or “facts”, to prove what they say is true. Both sides will quote professors and throw in scientific findings but the public – like the reporter – will not automatically know which set of “facts” is more reliable.

If normal journalistic balance is applied then both arguments will be presented as having equal weight. But this ignores the reality of the research findings in climate change. While both sides can quote their professors and experts, more than 95 per cent of all the research findings support claims for human induced climate change. Findings quoted by the climate sceptics represent only a tiny fraction of all the research being done.

Unless Attkisson has been reporting from a cave for the last few years, she should know that the vast weight of evidence speaks against a vaccine-autism link. To suggest otherwise, via her double bank shot association of unrelated facts, makes her unfit as a health and science reporter.

cross posted at AutismNewsBeat

49 Responses to “Sharyl Attkisson didn’t get the memo”

  1. Science Mom January 28, 2011 at 23:26 #

    Not shocking given the vapid, one-trick-pony Attkisson is. I am disappointed, however, that CBS hasn’t seen fit to reign her in, give her a brain transplant or replace her.

  2. Liz Ditz January 28, 2011 at 23:57 #

    For a refreshing change of pace, please read Bill Heisel’s seven part series on what health reporters should learn from the Wakefield debacle.

    The link is to the last post in the series — it has links to the previous six.

    http://www.reportingonhealth.org/blogs/wakefields-wake-part-7-blowback-can-be-fierce-and-frightening-autism-vaccine-stories#comment-549

  3. sharon January 29, 2011 at 00:11 #

    I am making the assumption that journalists operates under a code of ethics? And that those codes closely reflect the points made by Mr Ahlstrom? So I wonder if there is capacity to write to CBS outlining any perceived contraventions by their staff? I’m sure it’s been done already, and so I wonder what the standard response is? I suppose this is a question for anyone who has made the effort previously to write a complaint, or for a journalist to explain what if any procedures exist when written complaints are made about journalistic integrity, or lack thereof?

  4. MrC January 29, 2011 at 01:38 #

    Sharyl Attkisson didn’t contact the author of that paper. I know, because I did and her response was quick and clear: the type of seizures that typically follow vaccination are *not* the same as the seizures which are discussed in the paper.

    Sharyl, pull the post. You screwed up. You put kids like mine–kids with epilepsy–at greater risk.

    Kim Stagliano copied the information. She should know better. Kim, why? Why endanger kids?

  5. Roger Kulp January 29, 2011 at 02:47 #

    I see this as just another variation of the old Hannah Poling trick,take a known genetic syndrome,or syndromes,known to cause autism,or features of autism,and try to extraploate it to promote an antivax agenda.These people can’t think of anything new.

  6. sheldon101 January 29, 2011 at 05:10 #

    It doesn’t matter to her how many times it is pointed out that the Poling compensation was based on autistic symptoms rather than autism, she keeps repeating the lie.

    • Sullivan January 29, 2011 at 05:56 #

      It doesn’t matter to her how many times it is pointed out that the Poling compensation was based on autistic symptoms rather than autism, she keeps repeating the lie.

      Also, the concession doesn’t say anything about causation. Seth Mnookin in Panic Virus tells of a conversation he had with Jon Poling where Dr. Poling states clearly that the concession had says nothing about causation. I’ll try to find that.

  7. sharon January 29, 2011 at 05:29 #

    Thanks Sullivan, that link goes some way to answering my question. I suppose we have no way of knowing in what form CBS came to be made aware, thereby taking action.
    It’s easy to be outraged but I’d be reassured to know that appropriately qualified people would notify networks and media outlets when these outrageous articles appear. Surely the best way to pressure media organisations to do better in this regard is to continue calling their staff and editors to account.

  8. bensmyson January 29, 2011 at 07:10 #

    From:

    Molecular mechanisms of cognitive and behavioral comorbidities of epilepsy in children
    Amy Brooks-Kayal
    Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology, Division of Pediatric Neurology, University of Colorado Denver School
    of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, U.S.A.

    “In a recent study, animals that experienced prolonged febrile seizures (PFS) in early life under-went MRI imaging after seizures and then testing of spatial learning and memory in adulthood (Dube et al., 2009). Half of animals exposed to PFS were found to have T2-signal abnormalities in hippocampus, and the spatial learning and memory performances in rats that experienced PFS and also had T2 MRI changes were impaired compared to the rats that had prolonged febrile seizures (>10 minutes in duration) with no T2 changes, thus identifying MRI imaging as a possible biomarker for future hippocampal learning and memory dysfunction after early life seizures.”

    One third of febrile seizures are “complex,” since they are either multiple, focal, or prolonged.

    Febrile seizures recur in a third of children and are associated with a low risk of epilepsy

    Febrile seizures are prolonged in 9% of cases.

    Prolonged febrile seizures increase the incidence of epilepsy to 21%.

    9/10,000 develop febrile seizures as a result of the use of ProQuad, an MMRV

    https://www.merckvaccines.com/CustomerLetterPQD_0307.pdf

    Approximately 9 out of 10,000 children 6-23 months of age require hospitalization each season for reasons related to influenza.

    http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/SafetyAvailability/VaccineSafety/ucm240037.htm

    Curious, if the chances of your child having serious complication of the flu scare you, shouldn’t it also be a case of concern that your child may receive a seizure brought on by an MMRV vaccine?

    And if your child has a febrile seizure, he will roughly have a 1 in 10 chance of developing serious brain injuries as a result as well as a chance of developing epilepsy, which is associated with ASD.

  9. Tom January 30, 2011 at 16:04 #

    Febrile seizures after MMR are not associated with increased risk of epilepsy. BMS, you sure do go a long way to misrepresent known facts.

    http://www.immunizationinfo.org/science/mmr-vaccination-and-febrile-seizures

  10. bensmyson January 30, 2011 at 16:55 #

    The general garden variety version of febrile seizures have not proven to be dangerous, however as per my post above, one third of all febrile seizures are COMPLEX febrile seizures and of those complex seizures 9% are Prolonged Febrile Seizures and Prolonged Febrile Seizures increase the incidence of epilepsy to 21%.

    It stands to reason that if MMR’s cause febrile seizures and some of those seizures are prolonged then MMR’s can cause epilepsy. Admittedly Brooks-Kayal investigation did not look at the MMR, it did show a relationship between febrile seizures and autism.

    • Sullivan January 30, 2011 at 23:18 #

      Sharyl Attkisson should never have cited the paper she included in her piece. She was correct to remove it, but failed to do the right thing and make it clear that a correction was made. The Age of Autism blog has refused to make the correction and has, instead, doubled-down on unsubstantiated fear by posting comments which cobble together statistics to support the message of fear. Bensmyson has commented there, on Seth Mnookin’s blog and here.

      The fact of the matter is that the study linked to by CBS and AOA does not support the idea that the seizures caused by vaccines “may contribute to enhanced risk of” intellectual disability and autism.

      This isn’t my opinion from reading the paper. This is the opinion of the study author. Here’s an email that the author of the study–the study that CBS included then removed in their article–had to say to Seth Mnookin:

      The type of seizures that I refer to in my article are not the type of seizure typically brought on by vaccination (which as you note are usually brief febrile seizures), and to my knowledge there has been no valid scientific link between brief febrile seizures after the flu vaccine and permanent neurological injury. Vaccination to prevent the flu is a very important preventative health measure, particularly for children with chronic illnesses such as epilepsy. Our group recently published an article showing a high rate of serious complications from the H1N1 flu in pediatric patients with neurological problems, particularly recurrent seizures (epilepsy), emphasizing why it is so important for children to receive this vaccination. As a pediatric neurologist I recommend that my patients receive this vaccine and as a mother I have my own children vaccinated every year.

      What is even worse in this story is the fact that bensmyson has skipped over information that discounts his point. He cites papers for some statistics, while other statistics are unsupported. Checking the papers he does cite gives a very different story than the one he portrays.

      Here’s the summary from an artilcle in the BMJ that bensmyson used in a comment on AoA–a comment where he ignored this summary and cherry picked bits and pieces to create a conclusion 180 degrees opposite of this:

      “Febrile seizures are a common benign disorder with an excellent outcome. Exclusion of central nervous system infection such as meningitis and encephalitis is important, particularly in a child with febrile status epilepticus. Education and reassurance remains the mainstay of management for families faced with these frightening attacks. ”

      Over at Seth Mnookin’s blog, bensmyson cited an article in pediatrics, but skipped over this sentence

      The associated morbidity and mortality from febrile seizures is extremely low, with no associated adverse cognitive outcomes even when the seizures are prolonged

      The increase in febrile seizurs which may be occuring in these vaccines is important and something which does need to be studied so we can tell if it is real and, if so, why it is occuring and whether there is any risk of injury from this. But using this new report to incite fear is not helping anyone.

  11. bensmyson January 31, 2011 at 00:09 #

    Again, with the apology for repeating myself for the zillionth time, febrile seizures encompass the benign seizures Sully and others point to HOWEVER, febrile seizures also are made up of COMPLEX Febrile Seizures which include serious, a more catastrophic variety of seizures, seizures that cause epilepsy and developmental delays. Brooks-Kayal herself pointed this out in her study.

    “In a recent study, animals that experienced prolonged febrile seizures (PFS) (i.e., status epilepticus*) in early life under-went MRI imaging after seizures and then testing of spatial learning and memory in adulthood (Dube et al., 2009). Half of animals exposed to PFS were found to have T2-signal abnormalities in hippocampus, and the spatial learning and memory performances in rats that experienced PFS and also had T2 MRI changes were impaired compared to the rats that had prolonged febrile seizures (>10 minutes in duration) with no T2 changes, thus identifying MRI imaging as a possible biomarker for future hippocampal learning and memory dysfunction after early life seizures.”

    Febrile seizures recur in a third of children and are associated with a low risk of epilepsy http://www.bmj.com/content/334/7588/307

    Febrile seizures are prolonged in 9% of cases. http://www.bmj.com/content/334/7588/307

    One third of febrile seizures are “complex,” since they are either multiple, focal, or prolonged. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/117/2/304

    Sully’s pull quote:
    “The associated morbidity and mortality from febrile seizures is extremely low, with no associated adverse cognitive outcomes even when the seizures are prolonged”

    However, some children with prolonged febrile seizures are at risk for long-term cognitive disturbances. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2649663/

    From the study:
    “The type of seizures that I refer to in my article are not the type of seizure typically brought on by vaccination (which as you note are usually brief febrile seizures), and to my knowledge there has been no valid scientific link between brief febrile seizures after the flu vaccine and permanent neurological injury. ”

    She is right, brief febrile seizures rarely, if ever cause permanent neurological injury, however her study deals with Complex Febrile Seizures which occur in 33% of ALL febrile seizures and she shows that they do in fact cause such injuries.

    “Other more severe neurologic events, such as a prolonged convulsion or encephalopathy, although rare, have been reported in temporal association with DTP administration. .. Concern about the possible role of pertussis vaccine in causing neurologic reactions has been present since the earliest days of vaccine use. Rare but serious acute neurologic illnesses, including encephalitis/encephalopathy and prolonged convulsions, have been anecdotally reported following receipt of whole-cell pertussis vaccine given as DTP (62,63). Whether pertussis vaccine causes or is only coincidentally related to such illnesses or reveals an inevitable event has been difficult to determine conclusively for the following reasons: a) serious acute neurologic illnesses often occur or become manifest among children during the first year of life irrespective of vaccination; b) there is no specific clinical sign, pathologic finding, or laboratory test which can determine whether the illness is caused by the DTP; c) it may be difficult to determine with certainty whether infants less than 6 months of age are neurologically normal, which complicates assessment of whether vaccinees were already neurologically impaired before receiving DTP; and d) because these events are exceedingly rare, appropriately designed large studies are needed to address the question. ” http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00046738.htm

    “Children who had febrile seizures after vaccination were followed to identify the risk of subsequent seizures and other neurologic disabilities. …” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC320893/

    “Dravet syndrome is a rare genetic epileptic encephalopathy (dysfunction of the brain) with onset during the first year in an otherwise healthy infant. Mutations of the SCN1A gene cause 79% of diagnosed cases of Dravet syndrome. Frequently referred to as a sodium channelopathy, this intractable epilepsy is characterized by unilateral (one-sided) clonic or tonic clonic (grand mal) seizures that are prolonged (> 5 minutes) or progress to status epilepticus (>30 minutes) and require emergency management. Myoclonic seizures, often called myoclonic jerks, are common. Over time seizures present without fever, illness or heat triggers. Seizures are frequent and resistant to treatment. The first seizure is often associated vaccine administration at six months of age. Between one and four years of age, children develop other seizure types including atypical absence, eyelid myoclonia and non-convulsive seizures. All seizure types may be prolonged or lead to status epilepticus. Seizures are intractable (uncontrollable) and combination drug therapy is necessary for acceptable seizure control. Some anti-epileptic drugs exacerbate seizures and should be avoided. In most cases, surgery is not indicated. The initial EEG is normal but within the second or third year of life, brief generalized spike, polyspike, or polyspike-wave paroxysms appear. MRI and metabolic studies are normal. Developmental delays appear to varying degrees in most patients by age two years and ataxia (abnormal gait) is common. Confirmation of diagnosis by genetic testing, appropriate and aggressive seizure management, and implementation of global therapies are necessary to improve the outcome of children affected with Dravet syndrome.” http://www.cigna.com/healthinfo/nord1217.html

    I hope the links are of assistance to allow you to better follow the chain.

    * my addition http://www.rescuepost.com/files/lord-tembenis112910.pdf

  12. Tom January 31, 2011 at 01:02 #

    I feel sorry for Ben.

  13. bensmyson January 31, 2011 at 01:25 #

    Tom, that’s pretty fucking low. But it’s not the first time assholes like you on this site have stooped to personal attacks. This time I would hope Sully will remove your post. Bitch!

  14. Dewayne January 31, 2011 at 20:14 #

    Since the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act, 1980, research has been driven by the money! There is very little research on causes, through investigation of processes, or building an understanding of the situation. If the research you are proposing, does not have a future money stream, you will NOT receive funding! You have Sharyl Attkinsson on one side and Trine Tsouderos on the other. Read the research papers, get the raw data, if possible, and look at sample size. The Wakefield Study should have never been published, not because of the results, but the size of the population size was a JOKE! I have been doing research for over thirty years, finding answers to problems and building programs to solve those problems. Yes, in February 2010, I found the cause, trigger, common denominator, of Autism! This is not based on a sample size of 12, but close to 300,000 samples. When I educate the medical field, on immunity, then I can receive funding! Not going to happen!

  15. Chris January 31, 2011 at 21:11 #

    Yes, in February 2010, I found the cause, trigger, common denominator, of Autism!

    Which definition of autism? Does this eliminate the type of autism caused by Congenital Rubella Syndrome? Where did you publish your findings?

    I’m sorry, but your claim sounds like someone saying they have found the one cause and cure for cancer. Yet, cancer is not one disease with one cause.

  16. Tom February 1, 2011 at 19:31 #

    BMS,

    You want to know what low is? Low is coming on this site and continually demeaning autistics who don’t meet your arbitrary and mean-spirited criteria. Low is coming on this site and purposely misrepresenting the known science of vaccine safety to spread unfounded fears to fit some whacked, unhinged agenda.

    Your viscious, dishonest nonsense makes me wonder how you can be doing right by your son. You’re not doing him or any of us favors.

  17. Science Mom February 1, 2011 at 20:00 #

    Hey BMS, how did your NVICP claim go for you?

  18. bensmyson February 1, 2011 at 20:15 #

    Sorry you got your panties in a wad Tom. My “arbitrary and mean-spirited criteria” is neither.

    In fact I believe myself to be extremely generous and open to all sane and respectful comments and opinions. In fact Ken and I have butted heads many times over the past couple of years and he has never once stooped to personal attacks. There are only a couple of those found here that for some reason can not resist resorting to such poor sportsmanship.

    This argument about vaccines is a little more important than whether or not there is a Santa Claus and a little less important than the politics of war. It’s a broad spectrum providing amble room for all participants to have a say on an opinion.

    I don’t know everything, I want to learn everything, sometimes my opinions change, sometimes I hold opinions in reserve, sometime I present my case because I actually have respect for some of the posters here and value their debate.

    My guess is many of you mistake my ignorance as a weakness to feed off of instead of as a base in which to educate.

    I represent no threat, I am one man doing all I can to educate myself. I am not selling books, sitting opposite Steven Colbert on national TV nor am I anti-vaccine. I do have problems with ProQuad an MMRV and whether or not flu shots are worth the time and effort.

    I’m not here often enough to be able to always associate a particular username with some kind of persona. In other words Tom, I have no idea who you are and I suspect you have no idea who I am based on your misinformed and mean spirited comments.

    Apologize.

    To the rest of you, Im sorry for the language in my prior post. I honestly didn’t think it would be approved. I was blowing off steam.

  19. bensmyson February 1, 2011 at 20:21 #

    Thanks for your concern Mom, going fairly well, the respondent (DOJ) made an offer to settle, we filed last week to continue forward.

    How’s the husband and kids? Trust all is well at work, got to keep the kitty fed you know.

    • Sullivan February 3, 2011 at 01:57 #

      “Thanks for your concern Mom, going fairly well, the respondent (DOJ) made an offer to settle, we filed last week to continue forward.”

      I’m a bit confused by this. Are you saying that the DoJ conceded your case but you decided to stay in the program?

  20. Dewayne February 1, 2011 at 20:27 #

    Chris, Sorry, this is the business of research! When research is privately funded, you do not get the information published, unless the owners agree or if reimbursement is made. This is just the way things are. There are thousands of discoveries sitting in vaults that will never see the light of day, ever!

  21. Chris February 1, 2011 at 20:33 #

    Okay, so it will just an unsupported claim. Good to know. You’ll just have to understand we will not believe you until it is published, reviewed and replicated.

  22. Tom February 1, 2011 at 20:48 #

    Dewayne,

    You have some pretty silly notions about the research enterprise.

    Bayh-Dole unified the federal gov’s patent policies and gave favor to universities, non-profits and small businesses over the federal gov. in commercializing work funded by federal agencies. It has no bearing on granting decisions.

    Federal agencies give no consideration to commercial potential. NIH is almost all pure basic research, which by its very essence has no immediate or obvious commercial value. Funding decisions are made on the basis of the merits of a grant proposal and whether the investigator has the track record to accomplish the proposed research aims. Moreover, to suggest that NIH is not interested in looking at disease mechanisms is absurd in the extreme.

    Discoveries made with private funding are not locked away in vaults. They are patented and commercially developed by those private funding groups. Ever hear of venture capital? Somewhere down the line, most successful work gets published as a prelude to FDA approval and profits. Ever hear of capitalism?

  23. Chris February 1, 2011 at 20:57 #

    Plus, it never stopped the Geiers with their basement lab. They managed to publish their papers (granted, not in the best journals), and are selling their tests and franchising their method of chemically castrating kids.

    Sorry, Dewayne, you remind me of the Geiers.

  24. Science Mom February 1, 2011 at 21:55 #

    Thanks for your concern Mom, going fairly well, the respondent (DOJ) made an offer to settle, we filed last week to continue forward.

    Excellent, particularly in light that they dismissed as a table injury. I can’t wait to read the decision.

    How’s the husband and kids? Trust all is well at work, got to keep the kitty fed you know.

    Is this supposed to represent some familiarity with me?

  25. Dewayne February 1, 2011 at 21:57 #

    Tom, I have been at this for over thirty years! I know how funding is approved, believe me. It is all about the money! PERIOD! I do not say or write ANYTHING that is not the truth, so get over the comparisons and names. If the immunity situation was not so critical, from a National Security standpoint, in animals and humans, I would not care. You can find example after example of the lack of knowledge that the Federal Agencies and Experts have. For instance: Brucellosis at Yellowstone Park has been around since 1917, targeted for eradication since 1959, billions of dollars spent on research, projects published in all the finest Journals, and two vaccines developed and used, yet they still do not know why the elk and bison have brucellosis at Yellowstone National Park and the elk infect the cattle, not the bison. I rest my case!

  26. bensmyson February 1, 2011 at 22:08 #

    Mom- They dismissed the table injury? Really? Anyway, maybe in a year or two you can read all about it. Thanks for the support.

    I wouldnt really know if it rings a familiar tone with you or not, just making small talk. Kind of like how’s the weather or how’s vaccine court going. No one really cares when they ask things like that, it’s just talk.

  27. Tom February 1, 2011 at 23:18 #

    Google “Dewayne Brake” and judge for yourself.

  28. Science Mom February 1, 2011 at 23:25 #

    Mom- They dismissed the table injury? Really?

    According to you, yes. But I suppose you could be lying, not the first time.

    Anyway, maybe in a year or two you can read all about it. Thanks for the support.

    You’re welcome and I am very interested actually. The (even low) evidentiary standard is more difficult than a table injury so I wish you well with that.

  29. bensmyson February 1, 2011 at 23:34 #

    Who knows what I said about a table injury, a year or two ago I thought a table injury meant my son would have to seize on the table at the doctors office or something. Actually, dont know if you know this or not, but the “Table” is not a table, it’s a list of complications such as Anaphylaxis or Encephalopathy, usually within a particular time period unless the complication created any acute complication or sequela (including death) of above events.

    Sequela? The term “sequela” means a condition or event which was actually caused by a condition listed in the Vaccine Injury Table.

    Table injury is actually pretty easy to prove. The hard part was linking it to the vaccine.

    • Sullivan February 1, 2011 at 23:49 #

      bensmyson,

      I think most people here understand that the “table” is a paper table, much like a table in a scientific paper. I recall the comment before from you where you claimed that table injury meant that the injury occurred “on the table”. It was strange enough then to stand out.

      “Sequela” does not mean what you think it means. It does not have to be caused by a table injury. It is something that follows from or results from a previous event. A non-table injury is an sequela of a vaccination that is not covered by the table.

  30. bensmyson February 2, 2011 at 00:36 #

    Sully, I ain’t perfect, never claimed to be. 🙂

    “Sequela” my definition came directly from the United States Department of Health and Human Services. But to tell the truth I dont see a difference. Thanks.

  31. Dewayne February 2, 2011 at 00:48 #

    Tom, Did it list the Eight 501 (c)(3) non profit corporations that I am the Director of Research of and the others where I sit on the Board of Directors? Did it give you the link to our website? Did it give you pictures of our research facility? Did it give you a list of the diseases that I have worked with? Did it tell you that ALL the proceeds, from the work that I do, goes to house, feed, educate, and rehabilitate homeless veterans? What did it tell you, Tom?

  32. Chris February 2, 2011 at 00:56 #

    It showed that you make comments on lots of webpages, and could either be a certified exterminator technician or own New Generation Nutrition, which looks like it specializes in cattle feed.

  33. Dewayne February 2, 2011 at 01:06 #

    Chris, I hope you saw some of the dialogue, as well! But when you can answer the questions that I asked before, KEEP GOOGLING!

  34. Chris February 2, 2011 at 01:10 #

    Why bother? You are all bluster, and no substance (one of the links tried to load a virus onto my laptop). You are just one of a long line of folks who claim to have a big discovery that fail to support those claims. You are just like STY (who seems to have disappeared since the month he was going to make his big announcement passed).

    So, either put up or shut up.

  35. Science Mom February 2, 2011 at 01:28 #

    Who knows what I said about a table injury, a year or two ago I thought a table injury meant my son would have to seize on the table at the doctors office or something.

    Don’t you mean a scant 5 months ago? Can you please drop the coy act? It’s not particularly effective. It is astounding that in the midst of trying to conclude the OAP that the DoJ would have a turnaround time of only 5 months to notify you that you weren’t eligible for a table injury compensation.

    Actually, dont know if you know this or not, but the “Table” is not a table, it’s a list of complications such as Anaphylaxis or Encephalopathy, usually within a particular time period unless the complication created any acute complication or sequela (including death) of above events.

    Sequela? The term “sequela” means a condition or event which was actually caused by a condition listed in the Vaccine Injury Table.

    If you’re going to ‘do’ condescending, you may want to actually know what you are talking about and who you are trying to condescend to. I think Sullivan took care of the rest.

    Table injury is actually pretty easy to prove. The hard part was linking it to the vaccine.

    I think you are in denial, ignorant or both. Should your son have qualified for a table injury, i.e. no other precipitating event occurred or your time frame of events were not consistent with a table injury, then that is essentially tacit for ‘more likely than not to have been facilitated/caused (what have you) by the vaccine. Now by your own admission, your case is weak so I also find it astonishing that you were provided with an offer by the DoJ after being denied a table injury. By moving forward, do you mean that you are being offered a concession?

  36. Dewayne February 2, 2011 at 01:29 #

    Chris, Now! you are going to blame me for a virus from a website that I posted a comment to, but have nothing too do with! This is why nothing is ever solved, sling mud and belittle when someone has information they do not like. I have stated the facts, and this debate is played out daily. Talk is cheap and advice is free. Did you get your H1N1 Swine Flu Shot? If you did, you are also immune to the 1918 Spanish Flu!!! Great News Huh?

  37. Chris February 2, 2011 at 01:48 #

    Actually, I was not blaming you for the virus. It was just the quality of site your name was on.

    You have not provided me any information to dislike. You have actually not stated any facts, just conjecture and the ever popular dodge of “look it up yourself!” Ugh.

    Actually, I have had the H1N1 vaccine last year, this year’s influenza vaccine, along with receiving two experimental swine flu shots in 1976. So, yes, I am pretty much immune. Because I participated in the vaccine study in college, I missed out on the Russian flu a couple of years later.

    Your point?

    As noted, you are just another of a long line of folks who make claims and continually fail to support them. So, I repeat: Put up or shut up.

  38. bensmyson February 2, 2011 at 04:33 #

    Mom- You are so cute in a smarmy, chihuahua kind of way. In fact if anyone hasnt noticed, there is no conversation regarding the topic at hand here making this back and forth about as fun as watching Bum Fight videos.

    Mother dear you know absolutely nothing about me, but for a pint of cheap wine Im sure youd like to go another round with me so how about this, how is it my son’s case is weak? Because he has been diagnosed with regressive autism or because he suffers from a brain injury? Or is it because I cant prove beyond a shadow of a doubt the vaccine injured him? Or wait, because ProQuad doesnt cause e ncephalopathy? Is that it? Serious? Come on I’ve given you plenty to come at me with, Boone’s Farm baby, Strawberry Hill at that, chilled even!!!

  39. Dewayne February 2, 2011 at 13:25 #

    Chris, My point is that the H1N1 vaccine was made “specifically” for Swine Flu and not the Spanish Flu! After several thousand doses were given, the CDC and NIH, released information that the vaccine may contain the Spanish Flu. Later, this was confirmed! The H1N1 could become devastating if it aquired a Poultry component, this was blasted on every news channel and in every newsletter! How was the H1N1 vaccine grown……? Chicken Eggs! I hope that you and Tom continue to get the latest scientific and factual information, from Google. As far as “put up or shut up”, I prefer to have discussions in those big roundtable meetings, that the Autism Industry puts on. It is great to see the red faces and the veins popping out on the necks of those”experts”, when they tell the same old stories, with the same old lies, and get so frustrated when they cannot force me to do a damn thing!

  40. Chris February 2, 2011 at 16:13 #

    What part of “put up or shut up” do you fail to understand?

  41. Dewayne February 2, 2011 at 19:00 #

    Chris, HA HA HA! Nice conclusion to a real intelligent debate! This is the way most of these exchanges go, keep shouting and belittle those that do not share your view, but what I really want to know is, did the veins pop out on your neck or did you bust your a valve!!!!! I’m GONE!!!!!

  42. Chris February 2, 2011 at 19:05 #

    LOL! Excuse me, you have a view? How were we supposed to know? All you did was come here and declare you had found the cause and a cure, but it was a big secret.

    Actually, laughter is quite a healthy response to those who are all bluster and no substance. Thank for the humor break.

  43. Science Mom February 3, 2011 at 02:55 #

    Mom- You are so cute in a smarmy, chihuahua kind of way. In fact if anyone hasnt noticed, there is no conversation regarding the topic at hand here making this back and forth about as fun as watching Bum Fight videos.

    Mother dear you know absolutely nothing about me, but for a pint of cheap wine Im sure youd like to go another round with me so how about this, how is it my son’s case is weak? Because he has been diagnosed with regressive autism or because he suffers from a brain injury? Or is it because I cant prove beyond a shadow of a doubt the vaccine injured him? Or wait, because ProQuad doesnt cause e ncephalopathy? Is that it? Serious? Come on I’ve given you plenty to come at me with, Boone’s Farm baby, Strawberry Hill at that, chilled even

    Your taste in wine is rather unfortunate as is your transition from coy to odious. Forgive me if I take a pass. Your case is weak because even you say so. The standard of proof is very low for the NVICP, less than beyond a shadow of a doubt, with adequate medical reports, this shouldn’t be difficult to demonstrate to the court’s satisfaction. I never stated that ProQuad couldn’t or doesn’t cause encephalopathy; that’s a strawman. The point should be, does your son actually have or had an encephalopathy? Not your say so mind you, but diagnosed as such.

    I’m a bit confused by this. Are you saying that the DoJ conceded your case but you decided to stay in the program?

    @ Sullivan, I am curious about a clarification as well.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Tweets that mention Autism Blog - Sharyl Attkisson didn’t get the memo « Left Brain/Right Brain -- Topsy.com - January 29, 2011

    […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Kev, Alltop Autism. Alltop Autism said: Sharyl Attkisson didn’t get the memo http://bit.ly/gDCvZx […]

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