Today’s the day: Autism Science Foundation Sometimes it Pays to be Small fundraiser

26 Nov

Here’s a chance to participate in a fundraiser at no net cost to yourself. The Autism Science Foundation is participating in American Express’ “Small Business Saturday” event.

Register your American Express card
https://sync.americanexpress.com/sbs2011

Donate $25 to ASF
http://www.autismsciencefoundation.org/about/donate

American Express will credit you back $25

Today’s the day!! It’s American Express Small Business Saturday. Go to http://www.autismsciencefoundation.org/about/donate and make an online donation to the Autism Science Foundation using your registered American Express Card and Amex will give you a $25 statement credit.   If you make a $25 donation today, it’s like Amex is making the donation for you!!  

Every dollar counts for autism research. Please donate today!
 -Alison

Here is the original announcement:

Sometimes it pays to be small.

The Autism Science Foundation will be participating in American Express’ Small Business Saturday. Please register your American express card at https://sync.americanexpress.com/sbs2011  Then, on Saturday November 26, make a $25 dollar online donation to ASF and you will receive a $25 credit on your Amex bill. This means that Amex is actually making the donation!!  Learn more about the event here: http://smallbusinesssaturday.com/

You must register your AMEX card asap to participate in this program and you must make your donation to ASF on Nov 26 using that registered amex card.  Also, each Amex card will only receive one $25 statement credit so if you use your card at other registered small businesses that day you will only receive the one credit.

We’ll send a reminder the morning of November 26.  Thanks in advance. Every dollar counts!!!

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17 Responses to “Today’s the day: Autism Science Foundation Sometimes it Pays to be Small fundraiser”

  1. Kassiane November 26, 2011 at 22:20 #

    Autism Science Foundation doesn’t get a DIME until Alison Singer apologizes to autistic people and her child for Autism Every Day. None of this “I was in a bad place” BS or notpologies. real, sincere apologies.

    ASF is one more example of the autism community talking about what they want to do to the autistic community, & Ms Singer is the very embodiment of that.

    • Sullivan November 28, 2011 at 22:37 #

      Kassiane,

      I appreciate your comments. If you need a true apology before you would support ASF with money (or otherwise), that’s a valid stance.

      A few points to consider.

      1) The donations are going to ASF, not Alison Singer.
      2) A continuation of (1), really, but Alison Singer does not receive pay from ASF. She puts in 60+ hours a week, without pay.
      3) People financially supporting ASF will see a large fraction of that money go to autism research. One can review the projects that have been funded and judge based on that whether there is value in the donations.
      4) ASF does not use the harmful messages that Autism Speaks has used.
      5) ASF does include autistics in the grant review process.
      6) (a continuation of (5)) ASF does not advertise (5), which to me speaks to the idea that they are seeking the input sincerely, and not to quell public comment. I only know about this because I asked. I’ve never read about it anywhere.

      I look at ASF as an organization. I look at what ASF has done and is doing.

      This is not a simple decision, nor is it one I am recommending anyone else take.

      By the way, I don’t think there is a singular “autistic community” any more than there is a singular “autism community”. For example, the way “autistic community” is commonly used online does not include my kid (or children in general, from what I see). That is an important discussion which I hope we can have over time, separate from the discussion of ASF.

  2. Science Mom November 28, 2011 at 01:59 #

    Autism Science Foundation doesn’t get a DIME until Alison Singer apologizes to autistic people and her child for Autism Every Day. None of this “I was in a bad place” BS or notpologies. real, sincere apologies.

    I think ASF will get their dime whether you say so or not. I can understand how Dr. Singer’s statement affected the autism community, however she is human and to deny that parents of autistic children despair and have occasional dark thoughts is unrealistic. How one acts upon those thoughts and feelings is what should be judged.

  3. Landon Bryce November 28, 2011 at 04:40 #

    Dear Science Mom,

    Alison Singer is not a doctor. Her background is in television. It is perfectly fine for parents to have occasional dark thoughts. What Alison Singer did with hers was exploit them and her daughter to make money for Autism Speaks. Autism Every Day is still the top video when you search for “autism” on YouTube. Alison Singer is still telling hundreds, and sometimes thousands, of people every day just how understandable it is for parents of kids who have autism to kill them. If you’re okay with that, by all means give her all your money. If you actually care about autistic people and don’t consider us garbage undeserving of life, Alison Singer is not someone whose efforts you promote.

  4. sharon November 28, 2011 at 04:45 #

    I am in complete agreement with Science Mom. Let’s allow the space for people to make mistakes and move on. Alison and the Autism Science Foundation are working towards improving the lives of many people with ASD. As a casual observer it seems to me Alison Singer has always tried to act with integrity. In the clip mentioned above she spoke of her despair. A feeling many parents of autistic children experience from time to time. However she converted that despair into action and in my humble opinion that’s worthy of praise given how tragic outcomes can often be the consequences when parents feel there is no way forwards.

    I’m not dismissing the legitimate criticism of the youtube clip, but frankly I think bringing it up whenever Alison is mentioned, despite all the good work she is doing, is getting a bit old.

  5. Landon Bryce November 28, 2011 at 11:49 #

    Sharon,

    Again, “Autism Every Day” is the first video you will find if you search for “autism” on YouTube.

    And parents are still killing their autistic children– I know that for many of you that also “got old” after Karen McCarron. But Stephanie Rochester killed her six month old son because she thought he had autism just a few months ago. Boring, huh? And there are others parents who kill their kids, and judges and juries who let them off all the time. But that’s all gotten old, right?

    • Sullivan November 28, 2011 at 20:10 #

      “I know that for many of you that also “got old” after Karen McCarron”

      Unless you can read minds, I don’t see how you “know” this. Your statement is untrue in my case. So, what you “know” is false. I point this out not to correct you, since most people reading it already are aware that the statement is wrong, but to point out that such statements are not conducive to a discussion.

      Frankly, your statement comes across as exactly the sort of thing you claim to be complaining about: an inflammatory action which denigrates a whole group of people. Smaller in scope and kind, but in the same class.

      I ask this quite sincerely: are you attempting to engage people or demean them? You appear to be doing the latter.

  6. sharon November 28, 2011 at 12:31 #

    Landon you make the same point I did, but hopefully with less sarcasm.
    If you re-read what I said, it is that tragic consequences occur when people feel they have nowhere to turn. When they no longer feel they can share their feelings of hopelessness and access support to move forward. Alison Singer on the other hand didn’t go on to injure herself and her child, instead she got involved with an organisation she thought could offer support and hope to people in the Autism community. And when the focus of Autism Speaks no longer was aligned with her own views (on vaccine research) she did the right thing and left and started up ASF.
    The way I see it people have a choice. They can focus on the couple of minutes she was in that unfortunate video, or on everything she has done since.
    No parent would kill their child based on viewing that youtube clip alone. A desperate lack of hope leads to that tragic decision, and what Alison and the ASF is attempting to do is offer hope.

  7. Science Mom November 28, 2011 at 17:20 #

    Alison Singer is not a doctor. Her background is in television.

    My error, thanks for pointing that out.

    It is perfectly fine for parents to have occasional dark thoughts. What Alison Singer did with hers was exploit them and her daughter to make money for Autism Speaks.

    The only error Ms. Singer made was to voice those thoughts publicly recorded; I can’t agree that was exploitation for monetary gains, regardless of how many views the clip gets.

    Autism Every Day is still the top video when you search for “autism” on YouTube. Alison Singer is still telling hundreds, and sometimes thousands, of people every day just how understandable it is for parents of kids who have autism to kill them.

    Now you are being hysterical and I agree with Sharon that that video has not compelled anyone to kill their child, nor does she “tell people it’s okay to kill your autistic child”. And I don’t even like that video at all.

    If you’re okay with that, by all means give her all your money. If you actually care about autistic people and don’t consider us garbage undeserving of life, Alison Singer is not someone whose efforts you promote.

    I do donate and I encourage others to do so because I do believe that ASF is a very worthy autism foundation that is doing work that benefits the entire autism community. Again as Sharon said, Ms. Singer chose to turn her despair to positive action; I can’t see how you believe that she thinks autistic people are garbage and simultaneously acknowledge that it is understandable for parents of autistic children to experience rock-bottom despair.

    Has anyone discussed this matter with her directly? I don’t think this is a grudge (understandable) that autistics and families thereof should be carrying around, nor should it be what defines Ms. Singer and ASF.

  8. Kassiane November 28, 2011 at 20:41 #

    I don’t forgive people who want to kill their kids for being like me.

    ESPECIALLY people who are in places of relative privilege (ok, 150K/year to express how much her kid makes her life miserable is a lot of privilege) who express their desire to kill their kids like me.

    Oh, and 3 autistic kids were killed right after that video came out. One on Mother’s Day. If these rich people can’t handle their lives because their kids are autistic, how can people who aren’t rich? It legitimizes the woe feeling.

    Forgiveness is overrated. ESPECIALLY forgiveness of people who aren’t even sorry.

    • Sullivan November 29, 2011 at 02:13 #

      Kassiane,

      your last comment came in while I was writing my last comment. Keep in mind that I (and I suspect most people here) aren’t asking you to forgive. Or, for that matter, to not be critical of anyone, including me.

      I am not directly discussing the video for two reasons: (1) it isn’t really what this topic was about and (2) I refused to watch it. That puts me in a bad position to say this: I think Autism Speaks should pull it. Leave aside whether it contributes to the deaths of autistic children. The video should be pulled.

  9. sharon November 28, 2011 at 22:25 #

    Kassiane, if you listen to Alison in that video the fact she considers driving off a bridge is not due to her daughters autism, it is because of the societal barriers she was confronting at the time. The same social barriers that autistic self advocates also rail against. The situation, not her child, led to those feelings. I can’t emphasise enough how important it is to distinguish between the two.

  10. Kassiane November 29, 2011 at 05:28 #

    Any and every organization Ms Singer is involved with will be tainted by her “Driving off a bridge” comment.

    And by the articles of misunderstanding (remember those? Michael John Carley of GRASP did the other one. They were both nauseating), in which she stated that her daughter is “not abled”, which is also pretty offensive. Those were pretty solidly an exercise in Not Like My Child, incidentally. Not the same KIND as offensive as “I wish to drive my kid off a bridge”, but certainly unacceptable–and they’re pretty solid evidence of feeling that autistic advocates deserve little to no say in autism discourse.

    Whether she gets paid for it or not, my money doesn’t go to organizations spearheaded by people who tell the world that they considered killing their kids. And I don’t forgive people who aren’t sorry.

    I know, I know, I’m an asshat. But I’m an asshat who stands by my principles.

    • Sullivan November 29, 2011 at 06:55 #

      Kassiane,

      you say “asshat” like it’s a bad thing 😉

  11. Landon Bryce November 29, 2011 at 07:48 #

    Sullivan:

    Alison Signer has very successfully rehabilitated her image with NT parents. She has simply made no effort to build bridges with those of us who actually have autism. For you, and other parents, to act as though she is now an uncontroversial person who deserves nothing but respect and support is demeaning to me and to every other autistic person who believes that her work as the first CEO of Autism Speaks, her role as architect and primary seller of the most negative messages AS ever sent, are still hurting us. For those of you for whom tribalism over vaccines is the primary issue, she’s a hero. For those of those for whom the worth and dignity of autistic people is the primary issue, she is a villain. The contempt she has for us is still obvious to those of us who are targets of it.

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