IMFAR (the International Meeting For Autism Research) starts tomorrow.

11 May

IMFAR is the world’s largest autism science conference. I don’t recall the exact statistics, but there are probably over 1000 researchers who attend. Literally hundreds of presentations on various topics. I am not attending, but I will try to write a few articles about abstracts and topics that I think of are interest.

I do know that this year Shannon Rosa (twitter: @shannonrosa) and Carol Greenburg will be attending and tweeting and probably putting some thoughts up at the Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism (twitter: @thinkingautism, Facebook and the TPGA blog.

IMFAR shows what a huge effort is going on in autism research. People are working hard to understand autism and (more importantly) make a difference in the lives of autistics.


By Matt Carey

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2 Responses to “IMFAR (the International Meeting For Autism Research) starts tomorrow.”

  1. brian May 11, 2016 at 18:52 #

    The 2016 IMFAR abstracts are now available on line:

    https://imfar.confex.com/imfar/2016/webprogram/start.html

    Out of ca. 1,400 presentations at this year’s IMFAR, it seems that only one is clearly related to vaccines–the experts in the field have apparently moved on. The authors report that children with an older sib with ASD are less likely to be vaccinated than are children without an older sib with ASD.

    https://imfar.confex.com/imfar/2016/webprogram/Paper22579.html

    That’s not surprising. However, it’s still interesting that children with an older sib with ASD are not only less likely to be vaccinated, they are also about twelve times as likely as those without a sib with ASD to develop ASD, and they are, as well, more likely to develop other neurodevelopmental disorders and psychiatric disorders:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27145529

  2. lizditz May 15, 2016 at 04:53 #

    Really grateful to Shannon for doing such a great job of cogently tweeting what is happening at #IMFAR2016. I also connected with a few new interesting folk, both autistic and those doing autism research.

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