What “flattening the curve” means to my family

19 Mar

We hear a lot about “flattening the curve” these days. Here’s what this means to me (click to enlarge):

If hospitals are overwhelmed, my kid will not be high priority. My kid is disabled. If there are a limited number of ICU beds, for example, my kid very likely won’t get one.

So, thank you to everyone who is helping out. Everyone who is taking this seriously. It’s very, very tough, I know. But this is literally life and death for people like my kid.

By Matt Carey

5 Responses to “What “flattening the curve” means to my family”

  1. wzrd1 at 19:51 #

    What is worse for all is, your child is part of a much wider group, those with comorbidities, such as immune depressed (either due to HIV, immune therapy and cancer treatment, to name a few), diabetics, the elderly, to name just a few.
    The steeper the curve, the more people that will be unnecessarily lost, to the detriment of our society.

    • Sullivan (Matt Carey) at 00:23 #

      thanks for adding that. I was using my kid as an example of the broader community of people who, if the system is overwhelmed, will not receive the medical support they need.

      • wzrd1 at 01:39 #

        I didn’t mention it, but my wife is nearing 60, is diabetic and has a complex medical situation overall, so the risk to her is extreme. My own condition is also rather fragile, as my hyperthyroidism is currently untreated, leaving me with severe hypertension.
        The virus attaches to cells via the ACE2 receptor, which is part of two essential systems. One lowers blood pressure (ACE1 increases blood pressure), the other lowers inflammation. So, autoimmune disease, aortic dilation that was last measured at 2.7 cm, blood pressure in excess of 200/110.
        If either of us become ill with this virus, our survival is unlikely in the extreme.
        That said, if a child were ill (and our opinion of who is a child is substantially different from younger people), we’d, even ill champion for that younger person. We had our shot, they didn’t.

      • Sullivan (Matt Carey) at 21:22 #

        “That said, if a child were ill (and our opinion of who is a child is substantially different from younger people), we’d, even ill champion for that younger person. We had our shot, they didn’t.”

        That has to be the kindest thing I’ve ever read.

  2. doritmi at 01:12 #

    I hope you’re wrong, and am troubled by the fact that I can’t be totally sure of it. Your kid should not be considered less.

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