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Autism Science Foundation announces Pre & Post Doctoral Training Fellowships

21 Mar

The Autism Science Foundation has announced their pre-doctoral and post doctoral fellowships for this year. The press release is quoted below.

This is an area of research funding I approve of–supporting new researchers. The more new, good people we can pull into the field, the better off autism research will be in the long term.

Pre & Post Doctoral Training Fellowships Announced

(March 21, 2011-New York, NY)–The Autism Science Foundation, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to funding autism research, today announced the recipients of its annual pre and post doctoral fellowships. In all, $220,000 in grants will be awarded to student/mentor teams conducting research in autism interventions, early diagnosis, biomarkers, and animal models. This funding level represents a 22% increase over last year’s training fellowship grants.

“We are thrilled to be increasing our funding in only our second year of operations, and to be supporting such high quality grants”, said Autism Science Foundation co-founder Karen London. “Outstanding research is the greatest gift we can offer our families. We are so grateful to all our donors and volunteers who have come together to support autism research.”

The following new projects have been selected for funding:

Post Doctoral Fellowships:

* Jill Locke/David Mandell: University of Pennsylvania
Implementing Evidence-Based Social Skills Interventions in Public School Settings
* Portia McCoy/Ben Philpot: University of North Carolina
Ube3a Requirements for Structural Plasticity of Synapses
* Haley Speed/Craig Powell: UT Southwestern University
Identifying Impairments in Synaptic Connectivity in Mouse Models of ASD
* Elena Tenenbaum/Stephen Sheinkopf: Women & Infants Hospital andBrown University
Attentional Distribution and Word Learning in Children with Autism

Pre-Doctoral Fellowships:

* Jessica Bradshaw/Robert Koegel: University of California at Santa Barbara
Prelinguistic Symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Infancy
* Christie Buchovecky/Monica Justice: Baylor College of Medicine
Identifying Genetic Modifiers of Rett Syndrome in the Mouse

Read more about these studies.

The Autism Science Foundation is a 501(c)3 public charity that provides funding to scientists and organizations conducting autism research. ASF also provides information about autism to the general public and serves to increase awareness of autism spectrum disorders and the needs of individuals and families affected by autism. Learn more at http://www.autismsciencefoundation.org

disclaimer–I have accepted support from ASF to attend IMFAR 2011./

Autism Science Foundation announces IMFAR stakeholder travel grant recipients

10 Mar

The Autism Science Foundation has announced the recipients of this year’s stakeholder travel grants for IMFAR.

The press release is below:

AUTISM SCIENCE FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES
IMFAR STAKEHOLDER TRAVEL GRANT RECIPIENTS

IMFAR Stakeholder Travel Awards will Support Parents, Individuals with Autism, Teachers & Students

(March 10, 2011—New York, NY)–The Autism Science Foundation, a not for profit organization dedicated to supporting and funding autism research, today announced the recipients of its IMFAR Stakeholder Travel grants. ASF will make 11 awards of up to $1000 to be used to cover expenses related to attending the International Meeting for Autism Research in San Diego in May 2011. After the conference, grant recipients will be expected to share what they’ve learned with families in their local communities and/or online.

This year’s recipients are:

Geraldine Bliss–Parent
Matthew Carey–Parent
Shannon Des Roches Rosa–Parent
Mark Fornefeld–Self Identified Individual with Autism
Abby Hare–Graduate Student
Erin Lopes–Parent
Molly McGrath–Self Identified Individual with Autism/MIT Media Lab
Brianna Miller–Special Ed Teacher, Newark Public Schools
Sharman Ober-Reynolds–Parent/Senior Research Coordinator, SARRC
Megan O’Boyle –Parent
Max Rolison–Undergraduate Student

IMFAR is an annual scientific meeting, convened each spring, to promote exchange and dissemination of the latest scientific findings in autism research and to stimulate research progress in understanding the nature, causes, and treatments for autism spectrum disorders. IMFAR is the annual meeting of the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR).

“We are thrilled to be able to give back directly to the autism community in a research-focused way”, said Alison Singer, President of the Autism Science Foundation. “We are confident that the award recipients will all do a great job of bringing critical new research information to their communities, improving the speed with which the latest data are shared with the broader autism community.”

The Autism Science Foundation is a 501(c)(3) public charity launched in 2009 whose mission is to support autism research by providing funding to those who conduct, facilitate, publicize and disseminate autism research. ASF also provides information about autism to the general public and serves to increase awareness of autism spectrum disorders and the needs of individuals and families affected by autism.

The International Society for Autism Research (INSAR) is a scientific and professional organization devoted to advancing knowledge about autism spectrum disorders. INSAR was created in 2001. The society runs the annual scientific meeting – the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR) and publishes the research journal “Autism Research”.

Contact Info:

Julie Martin
Events and Media Manager
Autism Science Foundation
jmartin@autismsciencefoundation.org
419 Lafayette Street, 2nd floor
New York, NY 10003

Vaccines and Autism: A Story of Medicine, Science and Fear

2 Feb

Tomorrow on National Public Radio (US) The Diane Rehm Show will host a discussion of autism and vaccines: Vaccines and Autism: A Story of Medicine, Science and Fear

In 1998 a research paper was published that linked the childhood measles, mumps and rubella vaccine to the onset of autism, a life long developmental disorder. Follow up studies could not replicate the findings casting doubt on its conclusions, and earlier this year it was proven that this original study was, in fact, fraudulent. But the damage was done. Childhood vaccination rates dropped resulting in outbreaks of measles and whooping cough. Funds that would have gone to new research into the causes of autism were diverted, and surveys indicate that about one in five Americans continues to believe that a childhood vaccine can trigger autism. A story of fraudulent medical research and its consequences.

Guests will be:

Seth Mnookin: Author of “Feeding the Monster: How Money, Smarts, and Nerve Took a Team to the Top” and “Hard News: The Scandals at the New York Times and Their Meaning for American Media.” He is a contributing editor at “Vanity Fair” and a former senior writer for “Newsweek.”

Dr. Roberta DeBiasi: pediatric infectious diseases physician at Children’s National Medical Center

Alison Tepper Singer: Founder and President of the Autism Science Foundation, formerly Executive Vice President of Autism Speaks, served on the federal Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC.)

Alison Singer from Autism Science Foundation on CNN

7 Jan

Here’s the video:

http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/.element/apps/cvp/3.0/swf/cnn_416x234_embed.swf?context=embed&videoId=bestoftv/2011/01/07/exp.am.intv.chetry.autism.cnn

If anyone finds the Transcript from this video please post the address in the comments 🙂

Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee welcomes new members

30 Apr

The Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC) is a U.S. government committee which oversees autism research activities of the various U.S. agencies. The committee is made up of a representatives of those agencies plus members of the public.

The current public members are:

Lee Grossman
President and CEO
Autism Society

Yvette M. Janvier, M.D.
Medical Director
Children’s Specialized Hospital

Christine M. McKee, J.D.

Lyn Redwood, R.N., M.S.N.
Co-Founder and Vice President
Coalition for SafeMinds

Stephen M. Shore, Ed.D.
Executive Director
Autism Spectrum Consulting

Alison Tepper Singer, M.B.A.
President
Autism Science Foundation

Here is the announcement for the new members

Secretary Sebelius Announces New Members of the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced today the appointment of five new members to the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC), a federal advisory committee created in an effort to accelerate progress in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research and services.

The committee is composed of a diverse group of federal officials from HHS agencies and the Department of Education, as well as public members that include people with ASD, parents of people with ASD, and leaders of national ASD advocacy and research organizations.

In January 2009, the IACC released its first strategic plan for autism research. The IACC released a second edition of its strategic plan in January 2010.

“Today I am pleased to announce new members of the IACC, who will bring additional points of view and expertise to the committee,” Secretary Sebelius said. “I look forward to hearing from the committee members on important matters that affect people with autism and their families as we continue our efforts to address this urgent public health challenge.”

ASDs are a group of developmental disabilities that cause major social, communication and behavioral challenges with symptoms that present before age 3. ASDs affect each person in different ways and can range from very mild to severe. People with ASDs share some similar symptoms, such as problems with social interaction. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that an average of 1 in every 110 children in the United States has some form of ASD.

For more information on the IACC, visit http://www.iacc.hhs.gov/

New Members of the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee

Geraldine Dawson, Ph.D.
As chief science officer for Autism Speaks, Dr. Dawson works with the scientific community and stakeholders to shape and expand the foundation’s scientific vision. She also is a licensed clinical psychologist with a research focus on early detection and intervention, early patterns of brain dysfunction and the identification of biological markers for autism genetic studies. Dr. Dawson also serves as research professor of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, adjunct professor of psychiatry at Columbia University and professor emeritus of psychology at University of Washington.

Gerald D. Fischbach, M.D.
Dr. Fischbach is the scientific director for the Simons Foundation where he oversees the Autism Research Initiative. He has spent his career as a neuroscientist studying the formation and maintenance of synapses, the junctions between nerve cells which allow signals to be transmitted. Before joining the Simons Foundation, Dr. Fischbach served as the Director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke from 1998 to 2001 and as the Executive Vice President of Columbia University Medical Center and Dean of the faculties of medicine from 2001 to 2006.

Ari Ne’eman
Mr. Ari Ne’eman is the founding president of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, where he works to increase the representation of autistic people in public policy discussions. He is an adult on the autism spectrum and a leading advocate in the neurodiversity movement. Mr. Ne’eman has served on the New Jersey Adults with Autism Task Force and the New Jersey Special Education Review Commission, where he authored a minority report advocating legislative action against the use of aversives, restraint and seclusion. He is a board member of TASH, an advocacy group for people with disabilities, and is involved with the Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education.

Denise D. Resnik
Denise Resnik is the co-founder and board development chair of the Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center (SARRC). She is the mother of an 18-year-old son with autism. Ms. Resnik serves on the Autism Speaks Family Services Committee and Advancing Futures for Adults with Autism (AFAA) Steering Committee. She participated in the 2006 NIMH Autism Matrix Review and the IACC Scientific Workshops to develop the IACC Strategic Plan and subsequent updates.

Marjorie Solomon, Ph.D.
Assistant professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the University of California, Davis

Dr. Marjorie Solomon is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California, Davis. She serves on the Faculty of the Medical Investigation of Neurological Disorders (MIND) Institute and the Autism Research Training Program where she conducts research on a social skills training intervention for high-functioning children with ASD, incorporating parents and siblings in the research. In addition to her clinical research work, Dr. Solomon studies cognition and learning in high-functioning individuals with ASD.

Autism Science Foundation offering places at IMFAR 2010

11 Feb

Funds will enable parents and other stakeholders to attend the leading autism research conference and share what they’ve learned with the broader autism community.

The Autism Science Foundation today announced that is offering a limited number of grants to parents of children with autism and other stakeholders to support attendance at the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), to be held in Philadelphia, May 20-22, 2010. Awards of up to $1000 can be used to cover registration, travel, accommodations, meals and other directly related expenses, including childcare.

After the conference, grant recipients will be expected to share what they’ve learned with families in their local communities and/or online.

IMFAR is an annual scientific meeting, convened each spring, to promote, exchange and disseminate the latest scientific findings in autism research and to stimulate research progress in understanding the nature, causes, and treatments for autism spectrum disorders. IMFAR is the annual meeting of the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR).

“We are thrilled to be able to give back directly to the autism community in a research-focused way,” said Alison Singer, president of the Autism Science Foundation. “The award recipients will bring critical new research information to their communities, increasing the speed with which the latest data are shared with the broader autism community.”

“These scholarships are a wonderful opportunity to bring more stakeholders to the IMFAR and improve dissemination of the latest research findings presented at the conference,” said Dr. David Amaral, president of INSAR and director of research at the University of California at Davis M.I.N.D. Institute.

To apply, send a letter to grantsATautismsciencefoundationDOTorg describing why you want to attend IMFAR and, most importantly, explaining how you would share what you learn there with the broader autism community. Letters should be sent as Microsoft Word attachments of no more than 2 pages, 12-point type, “Arial” font, with standard margins. In the subject line please write: IMFAR Grant. Letters must be received by March 15, 2010. Recipients will be announced in April.