Upcoming Autism Conference

7 Apr

The Fifth Annual Meeting for Autism Research will shortly be going ahead in Montreal. There’s a few very interesting papers being discussed. Here’s a few abstracts:

No Autism Amongst Inuits From Northern Quebec?

_E. Fombonne, J. Morel, J. Macarthur_

*Background* : Autism has been found in most populations where it has been investigated. We have preliminary evidence that autism does not exist in the Inuit population of Northern Quebec

*Methods* : The authors know extensively the Inuit population (N=12,000) of Northern Quebec. They have been responsible for more than 15 years for pediatric care and special education in the 14 villages of this huge territory. There is a universal free health care and educational system, with repeated periodic medical examinations from birth onwards, compulsory attendance to school, and excellent medical/educational tracking record system for each child

*Results* : No case of autism was ever reported in an Inuit child in this population in the last 15 years. A computer search of discharge medical and psychiatric diagnoses failed to identify an ICD-9 diagnosis suggestive of autism or one of its variant. No case was referred for psychiatric evaluation or special educational assessment that would be consistent with autistic developmental impairments. In order to develop a full epidemiological enquiry, we have conducted a pilot study in 2 villages that demonstrated the feasibility of this planned investigation.

*Conclusion* : Autism appears to not exist amongst Inuits from Northern Quebec. If confirmed, it would have significant implications for the genetic understanding of autism. In addition, as Inuits are exposed through their fish-eating practices to high pre- and post-natal levels of mercury, it would also suggest that high mercury exposure in itself does not increase the risk of autism.

A STUDY OF MERCURY LEVELS IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM USING LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF HAIR SAMPLES

_P. G. Williams, J. Hersh, L. L. Sears_

Autism is a developmental disability characterized by severe, pervasive deficits in social interaction, communication and range of interests and activities. The neurobiologic basis of autism is well accepted, although the specific etiology is unknown. It has been theorized that autism may result from a combination of predisposing genes and environmental factors. While autism has a known association with some environmental factors such as rubella and valproic acid exposure in utero, other proposed environmental mechanisms such as mercury toxicity or other heavy metal exposure have limited research support. Despite this fact, interventions including oral chelation therapy are being used to treat autism after hair, blood or urine samples are analyzed by specialty laboratories. Controls and standards for these laboratories are often unclear with minimal data supporting differences in lab values for children with autism and typically developing children.

Hair samples were obtained from 14 children with autism and 16 controls between the ages of 2 and 6 years. These *samples were then sent to Doctors Data Lab* where mercury levels were reported. *The autism and control groups did not differ significantly in age or gender distribution*. Analysis of hair sample data by t-tests for equality of means and equal variance yielded *no significant difference in mercury levels for the two groups*. Despite the small sample size, results raise questions about the usefulness of evaluation for mercury exposure using hair samples, and about claims of mercury toxicity in children with autism.

BLOOD METAL CONCENTRATIONS IN THE CHARGE STUDY

_I. Hertz-Picciotto, P. G. Green, L. A. Croen, R. Hansen, P. Krakowiak_

*Background* : Adverse effects on neurodevelopment have been observed for lead and mercury. Previous reports of associations between body burdens of mercury and autism have been inconsistent or come from studies lacking rigorous quantitation of metals.

*Objectives* : To determine if blood levels of metals differ between children with versus without autism.

*Methods* : The CHARGE Study has been enrolling a population-based sample of 2-5 year old children with autism (AU), children with developmental delay (DD), and general population (GP) controls frequency matched on age, sex, and geographic region. Venous blood samples were drawn and metals were measured by inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry. Metals determinations were completed on 380 total children (261 AU, 40 DD, 79 GP). The AU cases were further divided into regressive (n=101) and early onset (n=119). ANOVA with unequal variances was used to compare means across groups.

*Results* : No significant difference in blood mercury was observed between the AU children (mercury mean±SD: 0.50±1.15 micrograms/dl) and either DD (0.41±0.51 micrograms/dl) or GP (0.51±0.74 micrograms/dl) children. Blood lead values were similar across AU, DD, and GP children (1.38, 1.30, 1.41 micrograms/dl, respectively). Similarly, children with a regressive trajectory versus early onset did not differ in their concentrations of circulating metals.

*Conclusions* : In 2-5 year olds, neither mercury nor lead concentration in peripheral blood of children with autism differs, on average, with that measured in population-based controls. Sponsors: NIEHS, EPA, M.I.N.D. Institute

M.I.N.D? Oh dear, what _will_ Rick Rollens have to say about that> _Thats_ not the result he paid to get!

In the meantime lets all look forward to the full release of these and the many other papers that will be presented.

*Update* Just noticed Autism Street has a similar post up.

45 Responses to “Upcoming Autism Conference”

  1. Jennifer April 7, 2006 at 16:30 #

    I’ve left the same comment on Autism Street (hopefully I got the links to work), but is noticed this abstract myself this morning. I think it is worth noting that the Inuit children are certainly not an unvaccinated population, although their vaccination rates are of the order of 70% compared to 80-95% for the rest of Canada.

    Click to access 2003_stat_profil_e.pdf

    – warning – a large PDF document, relevant tables on p. 37-39.

    Here’s another interesting paper on this population of children which also notes that they have low rates of asthma, even though a high proportion of parents smoke.

    http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/156/6/187?ijkey=cf26beefb45226ba946e525f245cb3453130a843

    These authors suggest that the eating lots of oily fish, as well as the absence of dust mites and cats might be of significance in the case of asthma.

    I thought this might be of particular interest to you, Kev.

  2. Jennifer April 7, 2006 at 17:16 #

    http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/156/6/1870?ijkey=cf26beefb45226ba946e525f245cb3453130a843

    This should be the link for the asthma study. I managed to delete a “0”, sorry.

  3. María Luján April 7, 2006 at 17:30 #

    Hi Kevin,
    I sent to you an e-mail about HM detection. Did you receive it?
    TIA
    MAría Luján

  4. Ms Clark April 7, 2006 at 20:56 #

    So far the only woo research I have found in the list of IMFAR abstracts seem to belong to Dr. Hendren of the MIND…. one is “we gave a bunch of kids a particular brand of vitamin pill, and the kids knew they were getting this pill and the parents knew, it was open label…and some of the kids got better in their behavior.” ooooh, and “now we should do a double blind cross-over placebo study of the same pill” Funded by the manufacturer of the pill. (PS3.13)

    What do you bet the manufacturer will use this poster presentation at IMFAR in their ads? What do you bet that thousands of parents will buy this stuff merely because of this little abstract found on the IMFAR site?

    Good investment of cash on the part of the vitamin manufacturer.

    Hendren says his subQ b12 study was double blinded. I don’t believe you can double blind B12 injections. I think all the parents knew when they were injecting b12 and when they weren’t, but I’ve asked an IRB lawyer guy to ask Hendren about that… and haven’t heard back yet.

    I don’t think that study should be presented as a double blind if it is not.

    http://www.cevs.ucdavis.edu/IMFAR/abst.cfm?abstid=6504
    That one is interesting

    http://www.cevs.ucdavis.edu/IMFAR/abst.cfm?abstid=6001
    Here’s one supported by DAN! ARI

    I’m a data point in one of the SBC studies… not saying which one.

    http://www.cevs.ucdavis.edu/IMFAR/abst.cfm?abstid=7041
    Little autistic kids are likely to get overdosed on vitamins by their parents.

    http://www.cevs.ucdavis.edu/IMFAR/abst.cfm?abstid=6402
    this looks like fun

    Our Sue M (on EoHarm) seems to be trying to promote the idea that Dr. Shattuck is open minded to the vaccine thing… which he is is to a certain small extent, about as open minded to the vaccine causation thing as Prometheus is… taking the cool headed scientific stance that we can’t know everything about all cases of autism. But he’s retracted what he said about the Hornig study being “intriguing” after being shown what trash the Hornig study is. He says he regrets making that comment about the Hornig study.

    Poor Dr Shattuck he’s been inundated with hate mail and other mail. Hate mail coming from lots of people sitting at home safely with their tin-foil hats on, no doubt. The ones who are so brave as to dodge speical mind-control bullets and risk being poisoned by the CIA at McDonalds are in Washington and probably not sending emails to Shattuck until they get back home.

    The CIA is now being blamed on the EoHarm list for putting thimerosal in vaccines… to bring down the population worldwide… or just to stop Erik Nanstiel’s progeny from procreating, maybe. Erik seems to be open to the idea that its’ all the CIA.

    One guesses that Handley will say it’s not the CIA, since his grandfather (?) was a CIA agent or something.

    I don’t think there was an autism epidemic caused by conspiracies, so I’m letting the CIA off the hook.

  5. Kev April 8, 2006 at 05:24 #

    Hi Maria, no sorry, I haven’t had an email from you in a few days…?

    Ms Clarke – I too have some sympathy for Paul Shattuck. Lisa Randall commented in the other thread about how autism research was turning into a vipers nest thanks to the mercury coalition. Paul Shattuck just got bit I guess.

    Krigsman’s latest rearguard action to defend his boss is on there too. Thats a little bit woo ;o)

  6. Ms Clark April 8, 2006 at 07:33 #

    Ahh, Krigsman.
    I see there’s a war of measles virus being in blood of autistics or not… if I read it right, it looks like the one can wipe the floor with the other because the guys who found the measles virus skipped an important step or two in proving whether the stuff they found was actually measles or just “noise”.

    Wakefield found “noise” and called it “measles” because that’w what he wanted to find… or so it seems. All we have to do now is ask him if he did that part where you check to see if it’s really measles, if he didn’t do that, then he found only “noise” or nothing.

    Maybe this will help to sink Wakefield in his upcoming case…
    kids are dying of measles thanks in part to Dr. Wakefield.

    Why does one man get to line his pockets at the expense of public health and individual deaths? AND walk around like he’s a god amongst certain autism parents.

    What’s the deal with Visceral. They funded a MIND study with several names on it…

  7. David N. Andrews BA-status, PgCertSpEd (pending) April 8, 2006 at 10:21 #

    MsC: “The CIA is now being blamed on the EoHarm list for putting thimerosal in vaccines… to bring down the population worldwide… … Erik seems to be open to the idea that its’ all the CIA.”

    What?

    Are you kidding?

    And that lot claim to be perfectly normal?

    Shitting Nora!

    Isn’t it amazing how the group IQ plummets to below the average for the group when there’s no check for reality allowed within the group!

    You’ll find that – if abnormal psychology is about the likes of me an’ thee (and how we allegedly fuck up) – then social psychology is about the likes of them (and how they … etc).

    But I wouldn’t put chelators into my kid on the flimsiest of bases, and neither would you. Our kids are safe.

  8. MAría Luján Ferreira April 8, 2006 at 13:46 #

    Hi Kevin
    I sent to you a comment April 5 and also other 2 mails last 2 days. I resent one of them now. One of lost ones included an attach.
    Camille, I think that it is unfortunate the fact that no really credible group for MAJORITY is involved in the research of measles virus kind. Looking at the published literature, not only in ASD but also in IBD and other diseases, there are some clues:
    a- it is difficult to find measles IgG in blood in certain diseases that could have measles located in other body fluids
    b-measles would be located in gut – certain parts and at certain depth-and can migrate to other tissues , especially if subclinical
    c-at least two groups have found a “measles related antigen” in different tissues. The problem is that they can not related straight to measles Edmonton strain or to a wild measles strain. Molecular mimicry and exchange of DNA parts have not been considered for me with enough care to have a definite conclussion
    d-it is certain that many autistic children react very well to antivirals.
    I think that beyond controversial personalities and interests there are problems with measles that have not been enough studied with the high level and high tech that they deserve. I think that , because of the nature of the infection, results can be tricky, depending of many factors.
    Please let me know if you are interested in some information I have found about measles detection problems and discussion about PCR detection. I can post there the list of studies if you are interested.
    María Luján

  9. clone3g April 8, 2006 at 14:13 #

    “a- it is difficult to find measles IgG in blood in certain diseases that could have measles located in other body fluids”

    So we should assume it’s there if even it can’t be detected?

    “d-it is certain that many autistic children react very well to antivirals.”

    How is that certain and how would that indicate measles? Antiviral medications used to treat herpes viruses have no effect on measles.

    The fact is that one group using one specific assay claims they’ve found a virus where others have failed. If it’s a matter of location in the body then why wouldn’t they share gut biopsy tissue for independent confirmation? Bradstreet and Weakfield both claim to have detected MV in the blood but suddenly it’s only detectable in the gut and CSF?

    No, it’s definitley there, we just have to look in the right places or use the “right” methods. Keep looking, we’ll find it no matter how long it takes.

    Hey, is that Nessie?

  10. Ms Clark April 8, 2006 at 14:34 #

    This group found no evidence of measles in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells. If there were measels in the intestines there would be measles in the blood. At one point Wakefield believed that, but it makes sense financially for the quacks to say that the kids need to be scoped in a very expensive way, where the child needs to have general anaestheisa.

    It’s like the quote:
    “If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion, provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes.”
    – Bertrand Russell

    This is the game that Wakefield began. Oh, those measles they are sooooo hard to find. Except that they aren’t hard to find if they are there.

    The lesions that Wakefield finds may be there in a minority of the kids, but we don’t know if the stress of being autistic has damaged their intestines, and we don’t know if having these lesions is any more common in autism than in other groups. The majority of autistic kids don’t have massive problems with gut pain an diarrhea, the main complaint is constipation.

    There is no such thing as “autistic enterocolitis” it’s a figment of Wakefield’s imagination. They don’t look for that disease anywhere on earth except amongst DAN! doctors and DAN! doctors have no credibility.

    Wakefiled also promotes the epidemic THAT NEVER HAPPENED. (excuse my yelling, but I”m getting sick of the “epidemic” that never happened. All the mainstream scientists know that there hasn’t been an epidemic of autism but some will promote it in order to keep scientific funding coming in)

    Primary Author’s Institution/Affiliation
    Division of Infectious Diseases, McGill University Health Center (MUHC)
    Abstract Title
    NO EVIDENCE OF PERSISTING MEASLES VIRUS IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS FROM CHILDREN WITH AUTISTIC SPECTRUM DISORDER
    List of Authors
    Y. L. D’Souza, E. Fombonne, B. J. Ward
    Enter your abstract here
    BACKGROUND: Claims of an association between measles, mumps and rubella vaccination (MMR) and the development of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are based primarily on the identification of measles virus (MV) nucleic acids in tissues and body fluids by PCR. These data come almost exclusively from a single group of investigators, Uhlmann and colleagues (Mol Pathol 2002; 55: 84-90).
    OBJECTIVES: We sought to replicate the PCR assays used by Uhlmann et al. to determine whether or not MV nucleic acids persist in children with ASD compared with non-ASD children.
    METHODS: We recruited 54 children with ASD and 34 developmentally normal controls referred to the Montreal Children’s Hospital. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and up to three real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assays were performed. These assays targeted the N, F and H genes of MV using the primer pairs published by Uhlmann et al., with detection by SYBR Green I. Amplicons from positive reactions were sequenced.
    RESULTS: The Uhlmann primer-based assays gave rise to a large number of positive reactions in both groups. For example, a positive signal was observed in 93% of ASD samples and 100% of the control samples using the F gene assay. Almost all of the positive reactions in the assays were eliminated by melting curve analysis and amplicon band-size on agarose gels. The amplicons for the remaining positive reactions were cloned and sequenced. No sample from either ASD or control groups was found to contain nucleic acids from any MV gene.
    CONCLUSION: There is no evidence of MV persistence in the PBMC of children with ASD.

    —–
    All we have to do is ask these guys who found what they thought was measles virus if they did the melting curve analysis and amplicon band-size on agarose gels… or so it was explained to me.

    Wakefield had financial reasons to lie about finding measles. There is no epidemiological statistics that show a relation between autism prevalence and measles vaccine usage. And even that quack in Florida who was kicked out of DAN! for a year for promoting exorcism for autism says that he found wild measles in the kids intestines, meaning that if vaccines can cause autism, so can wild measles, but wild measles is a known killer. Also that quack claims to be a “fellow” of the AAFP which signed a letter saying that people shouldn’t be in a hurry to take thimerosal out of vaccines and the organization is pro-vaccine.

    But Bradstreet is lying, he’s not a fellow of the AAFP. So he can’t resign in disgust, can he? He’s not even a member of the AAFP. Wakefield used to be Bradstreet’s “director of research.” And Kartzinel looks like he’s totally broken away from Bradstreet with Bradstreet making no explanation for why Kartzinel is no longer part of the practice.

    Bradstreet has recently claimed that he’s a clinical consultant to the MIND, but he’s not. I asked. Not that I had to ask. Bradstreet is totally whacked out about his credentials. But that fits with a guy who used to recommend exorcism for his atuistic patients.

    Exorcism killed an autistic boy here, you know, just a couple of years ago. I wonder if the parents had heard that Bradstreet recommended it.

    No, I don’t want you to send me or to share any studies about PCR. I will ask people who know PCR and measles what they think happened with Wakefield’s and others most likely fake measles findings.

    Autistic kids have something different about their immune systems, my child and my exhusband have these incredible immune systems, they almost never get infections. My kids never had ear infections, ever, when they were kids. My NT kid had one at about 18 years old and I was surprised. Some autistic kids are more sickly.

    If autisitcs are really responding positively to antivirals and not to the placebo effect, as is common in autism, it doesn’t mean that measles was causing their problems.

    —–

    David A.,

    Yes, there was a discussion where someone had built a conspiracy theory based on Bush and the CIA and some pharmacy corp. They are trying to wipe out the world, or something, to bring down the population. Erik N said something like he didn’t think the CIA was trying to kill Americans and others getting vaccines from the US, so much as they were trying to make them infertile.

    But Erik N of “FAIR Autism Media” can show up here any time and maybe he’ll explain it to us. I wonder if he decided not to go to Washington DC because the CIA are there waiting to take his reproductive powers away from him… very Doctor Strangelove.

    No, that EoHarm group doesn’t seem very bright. They don’t want to hear anything that challenges their preconceived notions. And I wouldn’t let any DAN! doctor within a mile of my child. Those people are dangerous, they’ll do anything for a buck including do things to kids that they don’t understand and shouldn’t be doing, like the psychiatrist in Florida who does IVIG out of his office and doesn’t have hospital privileges – who nearly killed a boy who left California to go to Florida to get IVIG when he could have had it done, easily, in Calfornia, if it were necessary.

    This is flaming insane. I think you are right, a big problem here has to do with the money making aspect of medicine and greed.

    If you want to see greed, all you have to do is go read about the Geiers on Kathleen’s blog. They are trying to patent a medical procedure, something that is seen as greed in it’s worst form everywhere on earth, except the US and Australia. Erik N is flacking for the Geiers and their procedure involving chemical castration. Nice.

  11. MAría Luján Ferreira April 8, 2006 at 16:36 #

    Hi Kevin
    I learnt about the links!
    Thank you very much for your kindness 🙂
    María Luján

  12. Sue M. April 8, 2006 at 16:52 #

    Ms. Clark wrote:

    “Our Sue M (on EoHarm) seems to be trying to promote the idea that Dr. Shattuck is open minded to the vaccine thing… which he is is to a certain small extent, about as open minded to the vaccine causation thing as Prometheus is… taking the cool headed scientific stance that we can’t know everything about all cases of autism. But he’s retracted what he said about the Hornig study being “intriguing” after being shown what trash the Hornig study is. He says he regrets making that comment about the Hornig study”.

    – He retracted it already. You showed him a few blog entries from some “experts” (used very loosely) and he’s gone back on that statement – interesting. What about the Burbacher and Pessah studies? Any comment on those yet? I sort of figured that it would be a good thing to have an open mind about the vaccine issue but you guys can’t seem to grasp that. That is disturbing. I will still give Shattuck the benefit of the doubt. Hopefully he has a backbone… If he doubts the Hornig study, Burbacher, Pessah, etc. than that is fine… but why? The answer can’t be… because the Diva told me so.

  13. MAría Luján Ferreira April 8, 2006 at 17:33 #

    Hi Mrs Clark
    Again, what I want to point out is that I am interested on what the truth is.
    About epidemics, I understand why you are angry about., even when I am open to the idea that an increase can could happen, perhaps not so high as claimed to be.
    You say
    No, I don’t want you to send me or to share any studies about PCR. I will ask people who know PCR and measles what they think happened with Wakefield’s and others most likely fake measles findings.

    Sure, I only offered because there are some tricky findings reported.

    Autistic kids have something different about their immune systems, my child and my exhusband have these incredible immune systems, they almost never get infections. My kids never had ear infections, ever, when they were kids. My NT kid had one at about 18 years old and I was surprised. Some autistic kids are more sickly.

    If autisitcs are really responding positively to antivirals and not to the placebo effect, as is common in autism, it doesn’t mean that measles was causing their problems.

    No, it doesn´t but also can not be discarded at all.
    I do think that the immune system with some alterations is present in some ASD children since born.
    I also mentioned these reports because they mention the molecular mimicry and the possibility of cross linking between human proteins and viral proteins.
    In a subclinical infection of measles- such as can be present in varicella that after can be demonstrated as shingles- the replication is in cycles and the count is low in general, but in the outbreaks can increase. I wonder, honestly, if all these findings in contradiction can not be, excluding problems that I agree must be discarded as you say Mrs Clark, explained by migration measles and subclinical infection in cycles, affecting different tissues and presenting antibodies in blood only in the replication cycles.
    María Luján

  14. M April 8, 2006 at 17:35 #

    The Inuit Study is interesting – there have been suggestions that their general health in the face of some very poor environmental factors is due to the very large amounts of EPA & DHA they consume (via fish oil), which acts as a cardiac/brain protector. But if you’ve also got a small gene pool it could all be in the genes – there are some interesting things about mitochondrial DNA tracing migrations to North America, and the Inuit do form a distinct group. It would be interesting to compare them to Aleutian Inuit, who have a similar mitochondiral signature because of that migration, but diverged thousands of years ago. They’ve also had a lot of crap from Soviet pollution as well.

    Sorry. Ramble.

  15. MAría Luján Ferreira April 8, 2006 at 17:45 #

    Hi M
    I think your comment is very interesting. Looking at the published science on the importance of EPA-and DHA- I think is also important, besides genetics.
    Do you know about a genetics study on Inuits vs Aleutians for example?
    Thank you in advance
    MAría Luján

  16. clone3g April 8, 2006 at 18:20 #

    Sue M. If he doubts the Hornig study, Burbacher, Pessah, etc. than that is fine… but why? The answer can’t be… because the Diva told me so.

    What’s to doubt Sue? Those studies tell us absolutley nothing about Autism. Nothing! Understand?

    If you think they are significant, that’s fine, but why? The answer can’t be… because the Sue M. told us so.

  17. MAría Luján Ferreira April 8, 2006 at 18:33 #

    Hi, an example of new techniques
    “New Paper “:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16274752&query_hl=19&itool=pubmed_docsum

    María Luján

  18. Joseph April 8, 2006 at 19:49 #

    There are a couple problems with the Inuit study. First this:

    A computer search of discharge medical and psychiatric diagnoses failed to identify an ICD-9 diagnosis suggestive of autism or one of its variant.

    At this point researchers should be aware that the number psychiatric diagnoses is not a good gauge of actual autism prevalence.

    Additionally, it looks like the population is only 12,000. As we know, the prevalence of autism was once 1 in 10,000. If this was due to a narrow definition (which is likely the case) then it’s not surprising if this is the kind of autism that is not found in the Inuit. Even with a current definition of classic autism, is it 3 in 10,000 now?

    The authors say they are starting an epidemiological study going village to village. They should go door to door evaluating a good portion of children (at least 500 I’d say) for Asperger’s syndrome, HFA and autism for the numbers to have any significance.

    Another thing they can do is look at the population classified as mentally retarded. This should be about 3% of the population or 360 individuals. They might find several autistics in this group.

    I don’t think it’s impossible for the Inuit to have an actual lower prevalence of autism. But then again, I’d expect every human population to have a fairly extensive socio-linguistic spectrum.

  19. Ms Clark April 8, 2006 at 22:44 #

    Joseph, there should be 1 in166 or 60 in 10,000 ASD kids.

    I don’t think the researchers would have gone to look only for “classic autism” and ignored the rest of the spectrum. There should be a whole bunch of kids who might be “speech delayed” or “non-verbal learning disability” or “specific learning disability” among the Inuit. If they aren’t finding kids with those kinds of related dxs, then there is something about this gene pool that is different, or maybe their diet… or maybe all that extra mercury is good for their unborn kids… not likely, so maybe it’s genes or fish oil… or cold weather…

    It’s interesting anyway, that there isn’t a link between mercury and autism in this group.

    Sue M.,

    Why do I think that you have never read the criticisms of the Hornig research? Why do I think that you have never read the Hornig paper at all? Maybe it’s because you have never pointed out what is wrong with the criticism of the Hornig paper on Autism Diva and elsewhere.

    Just because it’s not peer reviewed science, doesn’t mean that it’s not accurate science. Autism Diva should not be ranked next to Michelle Dawson’s work recently published in Brain… but it stands on it’s own for logic. Anyone can find flaws in the logic of an argument, but no one has found a flaw in the Diva’s and Prometheus’ reviews of the Hornig work. Apparently, Dr. Deth read them, he was given the links to them, but he didn’t comment on them at all. He also was given a link to the shredding of the Amy Holmes baby hair study, he didn’t comment on that either.

    It would seem that Dr. Deth couldn’t find a flaw in the arguments. Feel free to find the flaws that might be there… and then present them here for all of us to see.

    (I’m holding my breath… so hurry up…

    on second thought…)

    You come across as a whiner and a posturer with nothing to offer in the way of real scientific insight, but I’m sure that’s not your intention.

    Bummer about that lack of media coverage of the “mercury generation march”. I’m wondering if you could explain why the “mercury generation” logo looked like two stick figures grasping a baby by the throat or stepping on it’s neck. It’s really weird. I see the baby has a ball of mercury in it’s head. That’s cute. How about it’s kidneys? No mercury in it’s kidneys?

  20. Joseph April 8, 2006 at 23:34 #

    I don’t think the researchers would have gone to look only for “classic autism” and ignored the rest of the spectrum. There should be a whole bunch of kids who might be “speech delayed” or “non-verbal learning disability” or “specific learning disability” among the Inuit. If they aren’t finding kids with those kinds of related dxs, then there is something about this gene pool that is different, or maybe their diet… or maybe all that extra mercury is good for their unborn kids… not likely, so maybe it’s genes or fish oil… or cold weather…

    I’m sure they looked for any sign of autism. They say they looked for ICD-9 diagnoses. Autism is in that classification. There’s also Developmental Delay (which is not necessarily a good indicator of autism). There’s Developmental Speech Delay and Aphasia. Any others? Either way, it would not be surprising if speech-delayed children are very seldom given a psychiatric diagnosis in that population. The prevalence should be 60 in 10,000 – but this includes no speech delay with autistic behaviors, which can easily be missed. Also, this is the prevalence in children. I don’t think this translates the same way to all age groups. Let’s say there are 2,400 below the age of 10, then we should expect to find a total of 14 ASD kids in that age group, including those whose autism is barely noticeable. If you include speech delay, you might find only a few such children.

    That said, their intake of mercury coupled with the fact that they have good healthcare (which I assume means vaccinations) is of interest.

  21. David N. Andrews BA-status, PgCertSpEd (pending) April 9, 2006 at 01:43 #

    MsC: “If you want to see greed, all you have to do is go read about the Geiers on Kathleen’s blog. They are trying to patent a medical procedure, something that is seen as greed in it’s worst form everywhere on earth, except the US and Australia. Erik N is flacking for the Geiers and their procedure involving chemical castration. Nice.”

    Reaon enough to see those bastards as being the devil incarnate.

    Nuff said.

  22. Dad Of Cameron April 9, 2006 at 02:32 #

    That said, their intake of mercury coupled with the fact that they have good healthcare (which I assume means vaccinations) is of interest.

    Jennifer had noted (from another article specific to that population) that they had moderate/good vaccination rates. There are several tables in the PDF at the top of this thread. See pages 37-39.

  23. Ms Clark April 9, 2006 at 03:01 #

    !http://static.flickr.com/56/125433421_0977cf4d98_m.jpg!
    I’m trying to include the mercury generation march logo here…

    I don’t know why it took me so long to see that it’s an M and a lower case “g” and an apostrophe and “06” sort of layed over each other with two red dots to make the “M” into two people, each with two arms or two legs… which end at the “baby’s” throat. There’s a silver glob inside the baby’s head about the size of the baby’s brain… (rolls eyes)

    I love a good logo. This is a horrible logo for more than one reason.

    Another mom who marched in it posted on the board that the Neubranders use that only 100 people showed up for the march, which begs the question, “Why did the news station say that ‘nearly a thousand’ showed up?” I’m guessing the CIA …

  24. clone3g April 9, 2006 at 03:45 #

    100 people showed up for the march, which begs the question, “Why did the news station say that ‘nearly a thousand’ showed up?”

    There’s been a 6.02 x 10 23 increase in autism and you’re splitting hairs over a decimal place?

  25. Bartholomew Cubbins April 9, 2006 at 04:48 #

    Ha – clone you silly little mole, you.

    I’ve always loved Avacado’s number.

    mmmm…. time to look for some chips

  26. hollywoodjaded April 9, 2006 at 04:59 #

    omg ~ i got it!

  27. Ms Clark April 9, 2006 at 08:10 #

    I can’t tell you, clone, how happy I was to recognize 6.02 times 10 to the 23rd. I started laughing out loud.

    I’ve been a geek and a nerd for a long time, but only recently have been able to “get” chemistry jokes, makes me so proud.

    I’ll be pedantic and not explain it…

    Did I ever teach you guys (BC, Clone, Kev…Hollywoodjaded…) the autistic secret handshake? … I know y’all are trying to pass for NT parents of autistics…. but I think you are quite on the spectrum… not that I’d “out” anyone or anything like that. 🙂

    If I put the description of the autistic secret handshake here, all you who think you are NT will have to not read the description…otherwise it won’t be a secret handshake anymore…

    It’s best, of course, to teach someone in person…. Once you know it, you can get into Steven Spielberg and Dan Akroyd movies for free and even go swmming in their private pools … same for Bill Gates (think: free vaccines). You can even use his trampoline room for free … no really. If you walk into a poster store and show the secret handshake you can get a free Andy Warhol poster. If you walk into a bank… free $2 bills. (nods knowingly)

    How do you think I pay for all my websites? and the tiaras?

  28. Kev April 9, 2006 at 08:32 #

    ;o)

    Oddly enough, Amy Nelson pointed out to me that my score on Baron-Cohen’s AQ test indicated *strong* autie tendencies.

    It wouldn’t exactly be a shock. I have two (now deceased) relatives who were on the spectrum and one child on the spectrum – all have a greater depth on the spectrum than I would have, granted, but as I say – wouldn’t exactly be a shock ;o)

  29. Kev April 9, 2006 at 08:36 #

    _”I’ll be pedantic and not explain it…”_

    Now I have to hand in my tenuous membership badge – I didn’t get it :o( I’ll content myself with some scripting injokes:


    if($speaker == "krigsman") {
    $my.eyebrow.ypos ++;
    $speaker.credibility --;
    }

    Bleh.

  30. M April 9, 2006 at 08:42 #

    Why is the Inuit study using ICD-9 rather than ICD-10? Just a thought.

  31. M April 9, 2006 at 08:56 #

    Maria – I looked up ‘Aleut’ on pubmed, and there don’t seem to be any comparative studies that aren’t looking at prehistory rather than current events.

    However, there is this:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16283996&query_hl=2&itool=pubmed_docsum
    Are they really sure about their findings? In terms of cultural practices and a bad attack of ‘He’s fine, no really, what toys lined up in colour order, byeee.’

  32. Ruth April 9, 2006 at 12:47 #

    My daughter missed having a mole birth date by one day, 6pm 10-24 instead of 10-23. Yes, as a chemistry geek, I thought of it at the time. Don’t get me started on all the cis, trans, ortho, meta and para jokes. 🙂
    Wish the mercury march symbol was Hg instead of Mg. I collect old pharmacy books. Most old treatments for digestive problems involve Hg salts. Maybe gut problems are due to too little Hg.

  33. Joseph April 9, 2006 at 13:54 #

    if($speaker == “krigsman”) {
    $my.eyebrow.ypos ++;
    $speaker.credibility –;
    }

    PHP? I’m more of a Java guy myself. Have you seen the “How to tell if you are a Geek” section in the Geek article of Uncyclopedia?

  34. MAría Luján Ferreira April 9, 2006 at 14:12 #

    M
    Thank you very much for the link.

    clone
    I am interested to see what use you will give to the Planck constant. :))

    I do not fit in the Geek definition, Joseph, probably I have always been a nerd (school, high school and college).

    Ruth, I know what are you talking about:
    “Thinking in chemistry codes”

    María Luján

  35. Ms Clark April 9, 2006 at 17:06 #

    AHah!

    We’ve outed Maria! Don’t tell me you aren’t perseverating Maria.

    🙂

    Avogadro’s (BC turned it into “Avocado’s”, very neologistic of him) number is the number of atoms of any kind of matter in a mole… if you know Avogadro’s number you can tell how many atoms of a stuff is in a given amount of the stuff… 3 grams of oxygen has so many atoms of oxygen in it… yeah.

    Then there’s the ideal gas law. But you have to know Kelvin.

    Kelvin, I mean, Kevin, I didn’t get the code, but I’m guessing it’s something about one raised eyebrow… very geeky anyway.

    Maria and Ruth, turn your heads unless you are ready to identify as autistic. (there’s a paper on the IMFAR abstracts site that says that if the Dad is a geek it doesn’t seem to predict that his kid will be autistic, but if the mom is a geek… it’s all over for the kid… autistic… hands down)

    Oh, hands down. That’s how the instructions for the autistic secret handshake start. Stand. Let your hands hang down straight at the ends of your arms relaxed…

    Just standing there with your hands at your sides?

    If you are going to show the handshake to get the free poster , for instance, you need to make sure the person is watching… but that doesn’t mean that he must be foveating you. He or she might be autistic, too, especially if he has a nose ring and black eyeliner.

    (don’t peek if you aren’t autistic)

    …..

    …..

    raise your wrists about 4 inches to the front but keep your hands loose, snap your wrist downward and raise again, rattle your hands up and down this way so that your fingers sort of flop around.

    Eye contact is best avoided.
    Pysical contact with the person you are showing the secret handshake to is best avoided.

    At ease.

  36. MAría Luján Ferreira April 9, 2006 at 18:29 #

    Hi Mrs Clark
    I have no problem to say that I see in myself many characteristics of ASD . My son´s neurologists told me that I am a productive hyperactive with a touch of AD therefore… I suppose Hand up.
    María Luján

  37. clone3g April 9, 2006 at 20:55 #

    Ms Clark: Avogadro’s (BC turned it into “Avocado’s”, very neologistic of him) number is the number of atoms of any kind of matter in a mole

    No, he meant Avocado’s number which everyone knows is the number used to calculate guacomolarity or guacomolality. No poblano.

  38. Lorenzo's snake oil April 10, 2006 at 01:16 #

    Fombomme really, not known in Lorenzo’s world for being a scientist.

    This Inuit discovery would seem to say to me nothing more than that the Americentric definition of autism is somewhat of a cultural construction (rather like an electricity pylon really)

  39. David H April 10, 2006 at 17:22 #

    There are several studies that either compared autistics to non-autistics or discussed potential treatments. Seems to me that many autistic children are sick. Here are the conclusions from some of them:

    The presence of elevated levels of 8-iso-PGF2± (a marker and mediator of oxidative stress) in the white matter of frontal cortex and cerebellum, suggests that oxidative stress pathways are activated in these selected areas of the brain in autistic patients as compared with other regions.

    Initial findings present evidence supporting the use of methyl B12 injections as a beneficial treatment for some children with autism.

    Significantly decreased TGF was noted in ASD children compared with typically developing controls and children with other developmental disabilities (p

    B-cells from autistic donors who were non-verbal had higher rates of spontaneous apoptosis compared to controls and verbal autism patients

    The results suggest that autistic sera have elevated levels of HSPs 90 and 60 autoantibodies that may play a role in the pathogenesis of autism.

    C3/ C4 and ACT are the positive acute phase proteins in blood that facilitate immunological and inflammatory responses. Their increased levels in autism suggest that inflammatory reactions may play a role in the pathogenesis of autism.

    The data strongly support previous studies showing abnormalities of circulating proteins in autism. Our findings are suggestive of specific abnormalities in the immune system involving the complement system.

    Higher Th1/Th2 cytokine levels at baseline indicate that children with ASD have a generally activated adaptive immune response without significant skewing toward one arm. Relative to increased Th1 and Th2 cytokines, the IL-10 response in cases was significantly decreased. This insufficient IL-10 regulatory response supports the hypothesis of immune dysregulation in ASD.

    IGOH could improve AGID and behavioral problems in autistic children. An ongoing Phase II, dose-response trial involving 120 subjects (2-18 years old) with AGID will investigate this further.

    By Western analysis, plasma autoantibodies to specific proteins were observed against regions of the limbic system as well as the cerebellum in the ASD group compared to the control groups. Immunohistochemical analysis has thus far been confined to the cerebellum. Strong and selective immunoreactivity was noted in the plasma from 42% of children with autism towards what appear morphologically to be Golgi cells in the granular layer of the cerebellum. Such staining was absent in plasma from both the typically developing and disease controls.

    our results suggest a higher degree of phosphorylation of GFAP in the autistic cerebellum.

    Children subsequently diagnosed with ASD may have a higher rate of infection in the first 30 days of life and elevated rates of GI, genitourinary, and perinatal infections in the first two years of life.

    These preliminary findings suggest that serum antibodies from mothers who have children with autism may react against fetal brain proteins and may have detrimental effects during neurodevelopment.

  40. anonimouse April 10, 2006 at 19:00 #

    Links? Context?

  41. clone3g April 10, 2006 at 20:43 #

    They’re from IMFAR but you need the Cracker Jack decoder glasses to see the mercury connection:

    The presence of elevated levels of 8-iso-PGF2± (a marker and mediator of oxidative stress)

    We found markers of oxidative stress in autistic brain tissue + Hg can induce oxidative stress= Hg caused autism

    Initial findings present evidence supporting the use of methyl B12 injections as a beneficial treatment for some children with autism.

    Methyl B12 makes methylmercury which is much more toxic to brain cells therefore it will only benefit mercury free children? 🙂

    Significantly decreased TGF was noted in ASD children

    Hg induces and increases TGF-beta therefore children with elevated TGF-beta are mercury free.

    B-cells from autistic donors who were non-verbal had higher rates of spontaneous apoptosis compared to controls and verbal autism patients

    Everyone knows that Hg selectively induces apoptosis in B-cells. Guess that would fix the persistent immune memory problem.

    The results suggest that autistic sera have elevated levels of HSPs 90 and 60 autoantibodies

    B-cell apoptosis should fix that!

    C3/ C4 and ACT are the positive acute phase proteins in blood that facilitate immunological and inflammatory responses.

    Oh, too bad those are the wrong complement proteins triggered in real mercury toxicity. Does fit with a genetic mechanism though.

    Higher Th1/Th2 cytokine levels at baseline indicate that children with ASD have a generally activated adaptive immune response without significant skewing toward one arm. Relative to increased Th1 and Th2 cytokines, the IL-10 response in cases was significantly decreased.

    And how does mercury decrease IL-10 mRNA?

    IGOH could improve AGID and behavioral problems in autistic children

    Oral immunoglobulin? Chelator right?

    By Western analysis, plasma autoantibodies to specific proteins were observed against regions of the limbic system as well as the cerebellum in the ASD group compared to the control groups.

    Yeah, killing the B-cells should help here. What about the abstract concerning elevated maternal antibodies? Did the thimerosal in the children affect the mothers too?

    Children subsequently diagnosed with ASD may have a higher rate of infection in the first 30 days of life and elevated rates of GI, genitourinary, and perinatal infections in the first two years of life.

    What, you mean before they were vaccinated or regressed?

    These preliminary findings suggest that serum antibodies from mothers who have children with autism may react against fetal brain proteins and may have detrimental effects during neurodevelopment.

    Oh here it is then. So how does that implicate thimerosal or MMR?

  42. David H April 10, 2006 at 21:02 #

    “Oh here it is then. So how does that implicate thimerosal or MMR?”

    I never said it does implicate thimerosal. This is what I stated:

    “There are several studies that either compared autistics to non-autistics or discussed potential treatments. Seems to me that many autistic children are sick.”

    But keep in mind thimerosal is not given by itself. Because of this, you can’t just sit there and say thimerosal doesn’t do this or doesn’t do that. Has anyone studied the synergistic effects of vaccine ingredients & preservatives?

    But finding the vaccine strain of measles virus in the guts of autistic children does seem to implicate the MMR with bowel disease. It doesn’t mean it causes autism but it also doesn’t mean it couldn’t cause autism.

  43. clone3g April 10, 2006 at 21:14 #

    But keep in mind thimerosal is not given by itself. Because of this, you can’t just sit there and say thimerosal doesn’t do this or doesn’t do that.

    Correct, you can’t say that it does or doesn’t do that but that hasn’t stopped anyone from doing just that.

    Has anyone studied the synergistic effects of vaccine ingredients & preservatives?

    As Sue would say, be my guest.

    But finding the vaccine strain of measles virus in the guts of autistic children does seem to implicate the MMR with bowel disease.

    You mean finding something that matched the F gene amplicon, don’t you? Is that the same as the measles virus?

  44. David H April 10, 2006 at 21:33 #

    “You mean finding something that matched the F gene amplicon, don’t you? Is that the same as the measles virus?”

    Of the 70 that matched the F gene amplicon, fourteen have been verified by DNA sequence.

  45. clone3g April 12, 2006 at 14:29 #

    David H: Of the 70 that matched the F gene amplicon, fourteen have been verified by DNA sequence.

    So I’ll ask again, is it the same thing to detect a signal that suggests the presence of the measles virus and recovery of the actual virus?

    Hey, is that Lucille Ball standing in my living room?

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