Andrew Wakefield – I have no need of continued registration

14 Feb

In a remarkable and somewhat odd statement put out by Andrew Wakefield, he states:

I have no need of continued registration with the GMC…

Which is somewhat contrary to his statement of 2004 that;

It has been proposed that my role in this matter should be investigated by the GMC. I not only welcome this, I insist on it…

Why would someone insist upon being heard by an organisation he holds so little respect for he longer wants to be a member?

During the rest of the statement, he provides thanks to the support of his economic fan base – the parents, imcluding no doubt the parents of the children whom counr amongst the 11 counts of sticking tubes and needles into developmentally-challenged children without ethical approval, and nine counts of doing so contrary to the children’s wellbeing.

In a private email Brian Deer stated his opinion – which I share – that:

There can’t by any doubt that with four charges of dishonesty, including research and financial misconduct, that he knows he will be erased from the medical register.

Just _one_ of these substantiated charges would be enough to get a GP struck off. With the amount Andrew Wakefield has against his name it would be a small miracle if this didn’t happen and he is pre-emptively striking back at the GMC, declaring he doesn’t care if they do strip him of his right to be referred to as ‘doctor’.

I’ll leave the last words to Brian Deer, the man who single handedly brought down Andrew Wakefield:

His latest statement illustrates a more sinister aspect of Andrew Wakefield’s conduct: the mismatch between what has occurred outside the hearing and what has gone on inside. Outside – appealing to his economic base – he claims he is a victim of sinister forces – the drug industry and government and so forth – when he’s not the slightest evidence of this, (and neither have I). He was taken down by an old fashioned journalistic investigation, executed in the public interest.

And yet, inside the hearing, his behaviour was quite different. He called no witnesses whatsoever. While the prosecution called a parent who provided devastating evidence, he didn’t risk putting any of the ringleaders outside the building into the witness chair, where they could be cross-examined over how vulnerable children came to be brought to a hospital with no department or reputation for evaluating developmental disorders, and where doctors seemed all-but-entirely uninterested in the children’s futures. Nor did he put any questions whatsoever to the government’s vaccine chief, despite Wakefield supporters turning up for a much-hyped showdown. Nothing was asked, because Wakefield has nothing.

What the Wakefield project was all about was getting into the small intestines and spines of children without anybody finding out the reason. *And this is where, rightly, that project has brought him.*

17 Responses to “Andrew Wakefield – I have no need of continued registration”

  1. Sullivan February 14, 2010 at 17:07 #

    Here is Dr. Wakefield’s full statement, for any who are interested:

    http://tinyurl.com/DontNeedRegistration

    As far as I can see, he is correct. He doesn’t need GMC registration. Is there a job in the UK that can compete with a base salary of $270,000?

    Besides, he doesn’t have a license to practice in the US. Didn’t stop him from directing Thoughtful House. Is there some law that would require him to be GMC registered to set up Thoughtful House UK?

  2. sheldon101 February 14, 2010 at 18:09 #

    Wakefield’s quote may come from 2008, not 2010.

    Google “I have no need of continued registration with the GMC”
    then go down the page and find “Something with an a..” and select cached. This is http://74.125.47.132/search?q=cache:Bulqzw8W5HQJ:somethingbeginningwitha.blogspot.com/2008/06/letter-from-andrew-wakefield.html+%22I+have+no+need+of+continued+registration+with+the+GMC%22&cd=5&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca&client=firefox-a

    Which is dated 2008.

    • Sullivan February 14, 2010 at 18:31 #

      Sheldon101,

      the quote is post GMC hearing. The link in my comment above is to the autismfile website. Dr. Wakefield’s comment starts:

      “Understandably frustrated with my failure to provide a suitable post-GMC newsletter for the Thoughtful House website one of my colleagues posted a version of their own”

      • Sullivan February 14, 2010 at 18:37 #

        sheldon101,

        Sorry, Your link does look like the same statement I linked to.

  3. Dr Aust February 14, 2010 at 21:39 #

    Well, it’s literally true, isn’t it? He doesn’t need to be on the medical register. He is a successful businessman, smooth-talking entrepreneur, wheeler-dealer and salesman.

    Of course, some people might say that he always was.

  4. Robert Rampson February 15, 2010 at 03:01 #

    Brian Deer isn’t the only one demonstrating ‘old fashioned journalistic investigation, executed in the public interest.’

    Deer writes ‘he (Wakefield) claims he is a victim of sinister forces – the drug industry and government and so forth – when he’s not the slightest evidence of this, (and neither have I).’

    My understanding is that journalists other than Deer have demonstrated a similar old-fashioned journalistic investigation and are about to publish some quite damning facts that show that indeed Wakefiled WAS the victim of sinister forces from the drugs industry – and indirectly from the government.

    The debate is about to get very interesting indeed….

  5. pharma shill February 15, 2010 at 05:53 #

    Brian Deer = Big Pharma / Media SHILL

    LBRB = Big Pharma DISINFO

    Well, the truth is stronger than your lies you corporate rent boys & it’s coming to get you just like it took down Anthropogenic Global Warming.

    People are waking up to the crimes against humanity that you have helped to perpetrate with propaganda.

    You will be held to account for your actions which have directly resulted in the explosion in ASD & other related disorders.

    Truth is the new black baby…

    • Kev February 15, 2010 at 13:27 #

      Erm, what lies are they? And the truth is coming to get us? It already ‘got us’ all when Wakefield was found ‘guilty’ and his terrible work retracted.

  6. Robert Rampson February 15, 2010 at 09:55 #

    The website for Disease Control and Prevention reports Mumps outbreaks in New York, New Jersey among children injected with the MMR –

    ‘Vaccination status is known for 1,115 patients: 966 (91%) of 1,062 patients aged ?18 years and 149 (33%) of 456 patients aged ?19 years (Table). Of these patients, 976 (88%) had received at least 1 dose of mumps-containing vaccine before the outbreak, and 839 (75%) had received 2 doses. Among patients aged 7–18 years, the age group with the majority of cases and for whom 2 doses of MMR vaccine is recommended, 93% had received at least 1 dose, and 85% had received 2 doses.’ There is now a similar outbreak in Quebec.

    If MMR can cause mumps, could its Measles element be implicated in bowel disease and autism in a subset of children? Wakefield’s awkward question still hangs in the air, despite being hung out to dry by the GMC.

    If he is right then the pharmaceutical companies, faced with the cost of compensating a generation of poisoned children, would have to file for Chapter 11 (as happened to the big asbestos corporations over the cancer problems of a decade ago).

    One English doctor sure has opened a can of worms, and there are some worried men in pharmaceutical boardrooms.

  7. Becky Fisseux February 15, 2010 at 10:55 #

    @Robert Rampson

    The maths of your “more vaccinated than unvaccinated catch mumps” post is quite simple, and does not show that mumps vaccine causes mumps, nor does it show mumps vaccine to be ineffective.

    If you have a population of (say) one million, 95% of whom are vaccinated with a vaccine that prevents infection 95% of the time, and lets say that a disease will infect 50% of non-vaccinated people, if the whole population are exposed to the disease, then:

    50,000 non vaccinated people – 25,000 will get the disease.
    950,000 vaccinated people – 47,500 will get the disease.

    So, yes, in this simple example, 65% of those who got the disease were vaccinated.

    That’s a consequence of high vaccination rates and effective vaccines – it doesn’t imply either that the vaccine causes the disease, or that being vaccinated is more likely to leave you with the disease than not being.

    Kind regards,

    Becky

  8. Science Mom February 15, 2010 at 13:50 #

    My understanding is that journalists other than Deer have demonstrated a similar old-fashioned journalistic investigation and are about to publish some quite damning facts that show that indeed Wakefiled WAS the victim of sinister forces from the drugs industry – and indirectly from the government.

    Should be an interesting, if not comedic read. So there was a conspiracy to trick Wakefield into accepting money from the LAB? Not acquiring proper IRB approval? Invasive testing on autistic children that was not indicated? Fabricating his data? Withholding his COIs from the Lancet? And then the global illuminati took several years to take him to task?

    If MMR can cause mumps, could its Measles element be implicated in bowel disease and autism in a subset of children? Wakefield’s awkward question still hangs in the air, despite being hung out to dry by the GMC.

    Neither MMR-2, nor Priorix cause mumps and since he never found measles in the study children, his question isn’t awkward, it’s downright fabricated. He wasn’t hung out to dry, he had to finally answer to his egregious violations of physicians’ ethics.

  9. Dedj February 15, 2010 at 18:16 #

    “And then the global illuminati took several years to take him to task?”

    Indeed, this is one of many gaps in the global illuminati theory.

    Look on , say, the hearings section of the HPC website, and it’s not uncommon for people to have been reported, investigated, charged and found proven within two years of the event they are being charged over.

    So an organisation covering a diverse range of professions, in diverse settings – including non-traditional ones – can prosecute people in under two years, but the entire might of the mainstream machine has taken 6 times as long to ‘get’ someone, despite supposed intense effort?

    It would be interesting to see if the ‘facts’ alluded to by Robert above are actually worth anything or if they’ll be the sort of ‘facts’ that only a staunch Wakefield supporter would believe.

  10. Prometheus February 15, 2010 at 19:26 #

    Mr. Rampsom gleefully asserts:

    “My understanding is that journalists other than Deer have demonstrated a similar old-fashioned journalistic investigation and are about to publish some quite damning facts that show that indeed Wakefiled WAS the victim of sinister forces from the drugs industry – and indirectly from the government.”

    I believe he is referring to Ginger Taylor’s “web of conspiracy” that is dicussed here:

    http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2010/02/but_what_about_the_illuminati_and_david.php

    I’m always amused when conspiracy theorists promise “startling new information” that will “blow the top off the conspiracy”. It would be startling if their “revelations” were ever anything more than breathless fantasies.

    I eagerly await Mr. Rampson’s promised “damning facts”.

    Prometheus

  11. AutismNewsBeat February 17, 2010 at 20:01 #

    “Truth is the new black baby.”

    This sounds like a Mad Lib. Pharma Shill, what are you trying to say?

  12. Visitor February 17, 2010 at 20:18 #

    I’ve heard that at least three of the major players at Thoughtful House want Wakefield out.

  13. AutismNewsBeat February 17, 2010 at 21:37 #

    Those major players have a dilemma to sort out. Wakefield is a rock star to his patients, and if it appears that he’s been forced out, it could alienate a good portion of the patient base. But keeping Wakefield around draws the wrong kind of attention.

  14. Broken Link February 18, 2010 at 04:18 #

    According to various yahoo groups, Wakefield has just resigned from Thoughtful House. This is the TH statement:

    “The needs of the children we serve must always come first. All of us at
    Thoughtful House are grateful to Dr. Wakefield for the valuable work he has done
    here. We fully support his decision to leave Thoughtful House in order to make
    sure that the controversy surrounding the recent findings of the General Medical
    Council does not interfere with the important work that our dedicated team of
    clinicians and researchers is doing on behalf of children with autism and their
    families. All of us at Thoughtful House continue to fight every day for the
    recovery of children with developmental disorders. We will continue to do our
    very best to accomplish our mission by combining the most up-to-date treatments
    and important clinical research that will help to shape the understanding of
    these conditions that are affecting an ever-increasing number of children
    worldwide.
    Jane”

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