Another example of a “leading scientist” on the supposed “vaccine safety” side

30 Nov

Earlier this year a meeting was held in Jamaica as the self-named “Vaccine Safety Conference”.

Part of the “mission” of the meeting was “The conference will bring together leading scientists whose research has raised concerns about aspects of vaccine safety”.

Aside from Andrew Wakefield, who were among the “leading scientists”? Lawrence Palevsky, MD, FAAP. Dr. Palevsky is a holistic practitioner. I.e., alternative medical practitioner. His talk? “Rethinking the germ theory”. Yes, germs are a theory. The idea that viruses and bacteria are the causes of diseases is something which, after a bachelor’s degree and an MD, deserves more than a moment’s question.

Why?

Acute symptoms, such as fever, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, cough, runny nose, mucus production and wheezing, are all important ways in which children discharge stored accumulations of wastes or toxins from their bodies. These toxins enter and are stored in their bodies from repeated exposures to in utero, air, food, water, skin, nervous system stress, and injected materials, that for whatever reason, don’t easily exit their bodies through the normal means of detoxification. These toxins are too irritating to children’s bodies and must be removed. Eventually, a critical level of the toxins is reached, and children get sick with symptoms to purge them. Children, therefore, must be allowed to be sick, in order for them to get well.

Emphasis added.

You see, it isn’t the germs that cause disease. It is the build up of toxins. Children develop symptoms in order to purge the toxins.

How does one treat illness? In specific, how does one deal with fevers? Well, since “Dr. Palevsky does not recommend the use of over-the-counter medicine for fever reduction. He does not believe these medicines are safe for human consumption…” one should embrace fevers as an opportunity to purge toxins. So, instead of using these over-the-counter drugs to alleviate discomfort (or to ward off a really high fever, or protect your seizure prone kid from going into status epliepticus…) one can

To help your child feel better with the symptoms of fever, use one drop of lavender or German chamomile essential oil rubbed undiluted on the tops of both ears, and in the space between the largest vertebrae in the base of their neck and the vertebrae below it.

If there’s evidence and a good theory for that, it isn’t cited by the good doctor.

But wait, there’s more. Put your kid to bed with wet socks on. No, I am not making this up:

Use the wet sock treatment after the warm bath: put a pair of wet, cool, cotton socks on your child’s feet, followed by a pair of dry, wool socks, and put your child to bed. Dr. Palevsky thanks his naturopathic physician colleagues for this smart therapeutic intervention. Many parents report how much it helps to improve their children’s symptoms of fever and upper respiratory issues.

Once again, if there is a hypothesis (much less evidence) for why sleeping with wet socks is therapeutic, it isn’t discussed on his website.

I’ll leave with this paragraph talking about his speaking engagements:

Attendees will also learn that the expression of these symptoms is not necessarily caused by bacteria and viruses. Instead, these symptoms and illnesses occur as a sign our children are healthy; that their bodies are working to bring to the surface, and cleanse, any accumulation of wastes from deep inside, perhaps even with the aid of bacteria and viruses. You will come to understand that we are harming children with the constant use of over-the-counter medications, antibiotics, drugs and vaccines that treat and suppress common and necessary childhood symptoms and illnesses.

Yes, we should welcome these helping viruses and bacteria in our quest to cleanse ourselves of toxins.

Boggles the mind.

Advertisements

33 Responses to “Another example of a “leading scientist” on the supposed “vaccine safety” side”

  1. Henry Egan November 30, 2011 at 06:45 #

    actually there is plenty of evidence about risks of using OTC medication for fever. you can get plenty of information on this with just a little research.

    fever is a part of the immune system -it is activated for a reason and within certain parameters should be allowed to run its course.

    There are plenty of useful home remedies for fever reduction. Trying a few to see which one works for you might be a saner reaction than just freaking out and overdosing on Tylenol.

    Your sarcastic writing style does nothing for your argument by the way.

    • Sullivan November 30, 2011 at 21:37 #

      “Your sarcastic writing style does nothing for your argument by the way.”

      You have no idea how restrained I was in writing the above. As a parent, as a scientist, as a health consumer. His ideas are just plain nonsense.

      “fever is a part of the immune system -it is activated for a reason and within certain parameters should be allowed to run its course.”

      Note that the good doctor doesn’t give an indication of what those parameters really are. No statement of, “if you kid’s temperature hits XXX degrees, take the socks off and give the kid some medicine”. You could find that with just a little research (like following the link above). Was that sarcasm? Was it sarcasm when you made a similar statement? Did it help your argument?

  2. Julian Frost November 30, 2011 at 06:50 #

    And a too-high fever can actually cause harm. There is a reason we use OTC medication to control it.
    Sullivan’s “sarcastic” writing style might not convince you, but the good doctor’s unwillingness or inability to stump up sound evidence doesn’t convince me that he isn’t a fraud.

  3. Science Mom November 30, 2011 at 13:56 #

    fever is a part of the immune system -it is activated for a reason and within certain parameters should be allowed to run its course.

    There are plenty of useful home remedies for fever reduction. Trying a few to see which one works for you might be a saner reaction than just freaking out and overdosing on Tylenol.

    Your statements are contradictory. Fevers are not a disease and Americans are generally over-hysterical about them. However, Sullivan’s entry isn’t so much about fever treatment as it is Palevsky’s erroneous statements about fever origins and eschewing fever reducers or NSAIDs to treat discomfort. There is a place for fever management when discomfort is present and there are no safe home remedies.

  4. Joeymom November 30, 2011 at 13:56 #

    The homeopathic methods discussed here do work- for lower fevers. They are natural cooling techniques, using cooling points for the bloodstream (cooling extremities and points where important arteries and vessels pass). Such techniques help with comfort, though low-grade fevers should be allowed to resume if the person is able to sleep with them. However, those medicines are here for a reason. If your child’s fever hits 101, its time to pull out the stronger defenses to aid the body and keep that fever down. High fevers cause other damage to the body, especially the brain, and need to be properly controlled!

  5. Science Mom November 30, 2011 at 13:59 #

    And a too-high fever can actually cause harm.

    Only in rare cases of hyperthermia that this is the case, our capacity, even young children, to safely run high fevers is much better than is commonly believed. That said, Palevsky sounds like a graduate from the Hollywood Upstairs Medical College.

  6. Science Mom November 30, 2011 at 14:00 #

    The homeopathic methods discussed here do work- for lower fevers. They are natural cooling techniques, using cooling points for the bloodstream (cooling extremities and points where important arteries and vessels pass).

    I don’t suppose you would care to show some literature supporting this?

  7. daedalus2u November 30, 2011 at 17:28 #

    This is a bizarre idea. Even if it was correct, presumably the best thing to do would be to vaccinate children because then the immediate symptoms following vaccination would purge “toxins” from children. Unless the idea is that the feeble response following a vaccination (compared to the real illness) is too weak to purge sufficient “toxins”. But if “toxins” haven’t built up to a sufficient level to trigger purging, then they can’t be that bad.

    The real purpose of this conference (in my opinion) was to effectively “launder” the money that was donated to the charitable organization so it could be transferred to the owners of the resort that the conference was held at. All of the participants were merely useful idiots to facilitate the money laundering, in my opinion.

  8. Sullivan November 30, 2011 at 21:50 #

    There are plenty of useful home remedies for fever reduction. Trying a few to see which one works for you might be a saner reaction than just freaking out and overdosing on Tylenol.

    I guess if the only option I had for using medication was to “freak out and overdose”, that would be a bad choice. Luckily, that isn’t the option, now, is it? How about “keeping calm and using the correct dosage”? Why wasn’t that part of the options you considered?

    Perhaps you would be so good as to explain why putting a child to bed with wet socks will reduce a fever? Note that there will be very little in the way of evaporative cooling because the child’s feet will be in a semi-closed environment (underneath the blankets and sheets of his/her bed).

    Is the “wet sock” idea one of those which you included in your “useful home remedies”?

  9. Liz Ditz November 30, 2011 at 23:14 #

    Wrote JoeyMom

    The homeopathic methods discussed here do work- for lower fevers. They are natural cooling techniques, using cooling points for the bloodstream (cooling extremities and points where important arteries and vessels pass). Such techniques help with comfort,

    There’s nothing “homeopathic” about undiluted essential oils or damp clothes applied to the extremities. The two principles of homeopathy are “like cures like” and “dilution makes substances more powerful”.

    As far as the essential oils, there’s a risk with some oils of irritating the skin.

    As far as fever management goes, old-fashioned bedside nursing is still appropriate. I’m old enough to remember my mother using cool compresses etc.for our childhood illnesses. There’s nothing magic or naturopathic about it.

  10. Saraquill December 1, 2011 at 00:23 #

    Wet sock in bed? How disgusting. Just reading that makes my skin want to scream. And woe on the child who does not like the smell of flower oils so close to his/her nose.

  11. farmwifetwo December 1, 2011 at 15:04 #

    They have banned OTC meds for children under 6 in Canada.

    They just had another article on CBC about the long term damage of Tylenol and it’s generic counterparts. It doesn’t take much to overdose and over time it can do a lot of damage. http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2011/11/23/acetaminophen-overdose.html

    Ibprofen causes bp to go up… it’s on the list of things not to take if your bp is high.

    OTC meds are dangerous and need to be used with care. I do find it amazing how the herbals are shunned, research isn’t done…. Wouldn’t want to take a chunk out of the pharma companies bottom lines b/c of course their stuff is safe…. http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2011/06/29/avastin-breast-cancer.html Well atleast the day they put it on the market before the truth comes out….

    We use very little meds of any kind in this house.

  12. farmwifetwo December 1, 2011 at 15:07 #

    For those that don’t like the wet sock idea…

    My MIL to this day cannot stand the smell of onions. See when she was a child she came down with pneumonia in the middle of winter and 60yrs ago during storms rural areas were not plowed out in a timely fashion as they are today.

    Since the Dr couldn’t get to her they made up a huge onion poltice to clear her lungs.

    Nasty smelling, but effective. Not much difference putting a cold wet cloth on someone’s forehead vs putting it on their feet. Still does the job.

    • Sullivan December 1, 2011 at 23:13 #

      “Not much difference putting a cold wet cloth on someone’s forehead vs putting it on their feet. Still does the job.”

      There is a big difference, actually. Swabbing a forhead will result in evaporative cooling of the skin. Leaving a cold compress on the forehead will result in a the compress cooling from evaporation. Putting on wet socks will result in wet feet will result in warm, wet feet in a humid environment.

  13. Science Mom December 1, 2011 at 20:44 #

    They have banned OTC meds for children under 6 in Canada.

    No, cough and cold medicines have been re-labelled for children over the age of six and not recommended for children under six. Fever reducers and NSAIDs are not affected: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/medeff/res/cough-toux-faq-eng.php#a1

    They just had another article on CBC about the long term damage of Tylenol and it’s generic counterparts. It doesn’t take much to overdose and over time it can do a lot of damage.

    Chronic low-level overdose, duh, nothing new there. Consumers need to take responsibility you know.

    OTC meds are dangerous and need to be used with care. I do find it amazing how the herbals are shunned, research isn’t done…. Wouldn’t want to take a chunk out of the pharma companies bottom lines b/c of course their stuff is safe…. http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/…..ancer.html Well atleast the day they put it on the market before the truth comes out….

    I really don’t know what your point is here considering you linked to a blockbuster drug that was pulled from the market for being ineffective and unsafe. Oh no, those dastardly FDA people doing their job! Anyone is free to research herbal remedies, isolate active ingredients and patent them, oh wait, that is what pharmaceutical companies have been doing. I am not crying for Little Supplement considering the billions they are raking in with no oversight to have to worry about, nor Good Laboratory and Manufacturing Processes to worry about either.

    Since the Dr couldn’t get to her they made up a huge onion poltice to clear her lungs.

    Nasty smelling, but effective. Not much difference putting a cold wet cloth on someone’s forehead vs putting it on their feet. Still does the job.

    How do you know it is effective? Do you know what regression to the mean is? Besides, unless you know the mechanism of action (if there is even one), how can you claim that an onion poultice is the same as a wet wash cloth?

  14. stanley seigler December 2, 2011 at 05:38 #

    [LBRB say] Once again, if there is a hypothesis (much less evidence) for why sleeping with wet socks is therapeutic, it isn’t discussed on his website…

    forget autism VAX pro/con connection for a minute…google “fever, wet socks” (or something like that)…

    [CLIP] “The theory behind the Wet Socks Treatment is that if you put wet socks on kids with fevers, their bodies will work to raise their internal heat to warm their feet and thus allow their immune system to kick in.” http://www.sharecare.com/question/wet-socks-help-treat-fever

    stanley seigler

  15. Science Mom December 2, 2011 at 15:32 #

    CLIP] “The theory behind the Wet Socks Treatment is that if you put wet socks on kids with fevers, their bodies will work to raise their internal heat to warm their feet and thus allow their immune system to kick in.”

    This is a ridiculous postulation; that’s not how it works and scary coming from a doctor. The immune response is what causes the hypothalmus to raise the “set point” of body temperature via cytokines. Trying to reduce fever via wet socks is merely going to cause the hypothalmus to ‘work harder’ by keeping the temperature up which is going to not only cause the individual to feel worse but could actually increase the duration of fever and give the poor child a fungal infection. It’s just plain dumb.

  16. stanley seigler December 2, 2011 at 16:54 #

    @Science Mom This is a ridiculous postulation; that’s not how it works and scary coming from a doctor [roizen]…It’s just plain dumb.

    docs do a lot of scary things so guess i will take your word for it…however FYI:

    “Michael F. Roizen, MD, is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Williams College and Alpha Omega Alpha graduate of the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine. He performed his residency in internal medicine at Harvard’s Beth Israel Hospital and completed Public Health Service at the National Institutes of Health in the laboratory of Irv Kopin and Nobel Prize winner Julius Axelrod. He is certified by both the American Boards of Internal Medicine and of Anesthesiology…etcetc…”
    http://my.clevelandclinic.org/staff_directory/staff_display.aspx?doctorid=6161

    who’s a fellow to believe these days…

    stanley seigler

  17. Science Mom December 2, 2011 at 19:23 #

    @ Stanley, I saw what his pedigree was and it still doesn’t change the fact that his statement is incorrect from a physiological standpoint. Smart people say and do dumb things all the time, e.g. Bernadine Healy. Heck, I’m impressed with Dr. Offit’s credentials but even he says things from time to time that aren’t correct and so do I for that matter.

    • Sullivan December 2, 2011 at 19:30 #

      The “immune system kick in” statement is very odd. If one has a fever, one’s immune system has kicked in. (which is what Science Mom wrote).

  18. Prometheus December 2, 2011 at 20:54 #

    Henry Egan:

    “fever is a part of the immune system -it is activated for a reason and within certain parameters should be allowed to run its course.”

    This is actually three claims, one of which is false.

    “Fever is a part of the immune system…” – partly true. Fever is caused by some of the cytokines released during immune responses, but it hasn’t yet been shown to be a part of the immune system. With a few exceptions, the pathogenic bacteria, viruses and even parasites that infect us have a higher heat tolerance than we do. The “function” of fever – if it has a function – remains unclear.

    [Note: several studies have shown that failing to develop a fever in response to infection is associated with higher mortality. In these situations, the problem is not that the fever didn’t occur, but that the immune responses that produce fever as a “side effect” didn’t happen, leading to overwhelming sepsis.]

    “…it [fever] is activated for a reason…” – not true. As pointed out above, there is no known function for fever – it appears to be a “side effect” of immune responses (among other things – see: “fever of unknown origin, differential diagnosis of”). Saying that something happens “for a reason” implies either that the function is known or that the person making that claim has “faith” that a function exists without having any data to support that “faith”.

    Also, there appears to be no harm to the immune system from lowering body temperature to “normal”, apart from known side effects of any medications used. However, when simple mechanical means (tepid baths, wet cloths, etc.) are used to lower fever, no adverse effects have been noted. Therefore, the data show no “function” for fever.

    In fact, quite the opposite is known for severe fever, which causes all manner of cell types – including immune cells – to lose function and even die.

    “…within certain parameters [fever] should be allowed to run its course.” – true with conditions. Certainly there is no known adverse outcome from leaving mild fevers untreated. In fact, the most beneficial aspect of using NSAID’s for fever is that they also reduce the myalgia (muscle pain) and arthralgia (joint pain) that accompany cytokine release. The fever, on its own, is usually not symptomatic (apart from chills and perspiration) until the heat tolerance of the organism is exceeded (above 40 – 41 degrees in humans).

    Since most fevers don’t reach the level of a health hazard, there is no objective reason to treat them. However, treating the myalgias, arthralgias and chills that accompany a fever, while not medically necessary, is usually considered humane.

    Stanley Seigler,

    “…if you put wet socks on kids with fevers, their bodies will work to raise their internal heat to warm their feet and thus allow their immune system to kick in.”

    Are you serious? Check someone with a fever – are their hands and feet warm or cold? Fever raises the “set point” of the anterior hypothalamus, so the response in the periphery is to vasoconstrict blood vessels to conserve heat. Cooling their feet will have no effect, as those tissues are already being “sacrificed” to conserve heat in the core.

    On top of that, what about “fever” suggests that making raising the “internal heat” (production?) will improve the situation? Like most cells in the body (exception: seminiferous epithelium), the immune cells operate best at normal body temperature; their efficiency and life expectancy go down at elevated temperatures.

    While severely elevated temperatures can cause the immune system to “kick in” – in unexpected, maladaptive and often catastrophic way – I don’t think this is what you want to happen to your child or other family member.

    Finally, regarding Dr. Michael Roizen. He received an exemplary medical eduation and has been on the staff of several prestigious medical institutions. However, Dr. Roizen has more recently veered off into “fantasy-based” medicine, including his joint ventures with Dr. Mehmet Oz and other “alternative” practitioners to prevent aging.

    Sadly, even people with impecable credentials can go “off the rails”. Dr. Roizen, despite his impressive CV, is no longer a reliable source of medical information. It’s not that everything he says is wrong – he’s just not a reliable source, ever since he stopped being able to discern fact from fancy.

    Prometheus

  19. stanley seigler December 2, 2011 at 20:56 #

    @Sullivan “The ‘immune system kick in’ statement is very odd. If one has a fever, one’s immune system has kicked in. (which is what Science Mom wrote).”

    well if you “scientists” say so…but so much we dont know…and there are bloggers which say it worked for them…

    how can you and science mom…say it doesn’t work…and;

    what is the pedigreed doc motivation to suggest wet socks therapy…is he selling wet socks.

    BTW i grew up with similar, unbelievable, “wet sock” cures and they seemed to work…also;

    pastuer was a laughingstock of his day scientists…how could injecting an animal with the disease prevent the disease…HA, Ha, ha…oh pastuer you were such an idiot.

    perhaps nuff said as this not related to autism…

    stanley seigler

  20. stanley seigler December 2, 2011 at 21:38 #

    @Prometheus “Sadly, even people with impeccable credentials can go “off the rails”.

    agree 1000%…but does this say wet sock therapy doesn’t work…

    oh/and BTW…what are your impeccable creds (similar to roizen’s) and do you ever go off the rail…guess not you probably are the exception…never wrong…

    as mentioned there are bloggers who say wet socks works for them…and ;

    believer skinner said, “if it works its good” (something like that)

    seems the argument many on LBRB make is: if you dont agree with me you are off the rails…and this is my point…not pro/con wet socks.

    stanley seigler

  21. David N. Brown December 3, 2011 at 09:04 #

    “if you put wet socks on kids with fevers, their bodies will work to raise their internal heat to warm their feet and thus allow their immune system to kick in…”

    Actually makes sense as far as body temperature goes: If the extremities get colder, then the body will predictably generate more heat. The problem is that, while raising body temperature MIGHT inhibit some disease-causing microbes, it might be a boost to others. (I’ve seen this issue discussed specifically in comparisons of reptilian and mammalian metabolism.) And that is, of course, taking the “germ theory” as a given.

    David N. Brown
    Mesa, Arizona

    • Sullivan December 4, 2011 at 06:10 #

      ” If the extremities get colder, then the body will predictably generate more heat. ”

      David N. Brown,

      the body would have to expend slightly more energy than usual to heat the water in the socks. It would have to do the same if the person drank the water. Drinking the water would probably be a better idea.

      By the same logic the doctor is promoting, one could say, “sleep with bare feet outside your blanket”, as this would result in an even greater effort by one’s body to maintain body temperature.

      I need to find the link, but the good doctor has also stated that he doesn’t believe that a vaccine with a live virus can be safe.

  22. daedalus2u December 4, 2011 at 00:23 #

    What role fever plays in infection resolution is unknown. It very likely does because essentially all organisms that have an immune system and can regulate their body temperature attempt to raise it to deal with an infection. That includes mammals but also reptiles, fish and even insects. When individual tissue compartments are raised in temperature, that does provide a signal to some immune cells to translocate there and “do their thing”. Exactly what happens then is not fully understood.

    The effects of fever may not be mediated through temperature (but likely some are). In humans, fever is produced by mitochondrial respiration. That also increases superoxide formation, which also increases H2O2 production. H2O2 is a major substrate for the extracellular myeloperoxidase that immune cells generate in infected tissues.

    In a severe fever, the body has also expressed iNOS which is what drives the NO level so high that in sepsis people can die from hypotension. That very high NO level causes mitochondrial shut-down and forces cells to switch to glycolysis instead of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. That increases glucose demand by a lot. The high NO level also regulates ATP levels to be high, which is good because that shuts down mitochondria and also increases the activity of heat shock proteins which enable greater heat tolerance before proteins are denatured. That high NO level is very likely protective against the other things that are happening (high temperature, high ROS).

    Wet socks are likely a bad idea, mostly because they are non-physiologic. If they increase metabolic demand, then the liver has to work harder to supply more glucose to make up for that increased demand. If there isn’t enough glucose to maintain glycolysis, then risk of multiple organ failure go up.

    The tissue compartment that is most susceptible to permanent injury during fever is the brain. The brain is best cooled by wet compresses to the head, scalp and face. That is probably why those parts of the body become “flushed” during a fever, to specifically increase blood cooling by bringing it closer to the skin.

    When you have an infection, your physiology makes you feel sick and feeling sick makes you feel crappy because your body needs to divert ATP to resolving the infection and not to have you use that ATP traipsing around doing your normal routine. The reason you feel weak and crappy is so you will rest in bed so ATP can be diverted to resolving whatever it is that is making you feel weak and crappy. If you block those feelings of feeling weak and crappy, blocking those feelings doesn’t magically deliver more ATP so you can both fight the sickness and traipse around doing your normal routine.

  23. stanley seigler December 4, 2011 at 04:20 #

    @David N. Brown “Actually makes sense as far as body temperature goes…”

    kinda what i thought but didn’t wanta to get into a discussions with the scientists.

    @daedalus2u “What role fever plays in infection resolution is unknown…”

    believe this is so true of so much so many seem to know absolutely…

    stanley seigler

  24. daedalus2u December 4, 2011 at 04:41 #

    The mechanism is unknown, but when fever is interfered with, infections take longer to resolve. When cold blooded animals like reptiles, fish and insects are not given the opportunity to raise their body temperature, their infections take longer to resolve.

  25. David N. Brown December 5, 2011 at 22:22 #

    “…the good doctor has also stated that he doesn’t believe that a vaccine with a live virus can be safe.”

    Actually, that strikes me as a reasonable position on a major issue. As long as a vaccine is known to contain “live” germs, there is presumably SOME risk of it not only failing to work, but infecting a person with the disease it is supposed to prevent. That risk will have to be weighed against various other considerations, especially the availability and effectiveness of a “killed” alternative and the likelihood of contracting the “wild” disease. Of course, that is a far cry from rejecting all vaccines outright.

  26. stanley seigler December 7, 2011 at 04:30 #

    @LBRB, the below submitted several times over several days…pls post and delete previous…or advise…

    now get message: “Duplicate comment detected; it looks as though you’ve already said that!” but comments not posted…

    stanley seigler

    the below:

    @daedalus2u “…cold blooded animals like reptiles, fish and insects are not given the opportunity to raise their body temperature, their infections take longer to resolve.”

    will take your word for it…tho not sure what happens to reptiles is relevant to a child in wet socks…and doubt there have been any useless wet socks v reptile body temp studies.

    @Sullivan “…the good doctor has also stated that he doesn’t believe that a vaccine with a live virus can be safe.

    i missed the relationship of wet socks to belief live virus VAX is unsafe…ie, not sure it helps pro VAX position to throw in wet socks example to diss perhaps an antiVAX position…OTOH;

    perhaps i missed the reason for wet socks side issue…and as mentioned, i do not believe there is an autism/VAX connection…maybe a wetsocks/autism connection.

    stanley seigler

  27. stanley seigler December 8, 2011 at 04:52 #

    LBRB,

    have submitted same comment over several days which are not posted…post lastest and delete others…or advise…

    stanley seigler

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Another Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics who should know better | The Poxes Blog - January 22, 2015

    […] very loosely at this point), here’s an excellent piece-by-piece rebuttal of his statements by “Sullivan” at Left Brain Right Brain. In that rebuttal and in this page on Dr. Palevsky’s website, you’ll notice that Dr. […]

  2. Another example of a “leading scientist” on the supposed “vaccine safety” side | Left Brain Right Brain | Athe1stP0werBlog - February 20, 2015

    […] https://leftbrainrightbrain.co.uk/2011/11/30/another-example-of-a-leading-scientist-on-the-supposed-v… […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: