London McCabe

8 Nov

London McCabe was a six year old kid.  He was a kindergartner whose principal described him as loving to sing and happy.  He liked hats.

I wish when news outlets would report on murders, they would start with who was killed.  The good points of the person.  What we as a people lost.

I bring that up because, as you likely suspect, London McCabe was killed.  Earlier this week, London McCabe was killed when his mother threw him from a bridge, from which he dropped about 133 feet to the frigid waters of a river below.  That’s about a three second fall.  Three seconds is short, I grant you, but long enough to feel abject terror.

If news articles focused on the victim, perhaps that sort of fact would come forward.  Perhaps we would be put in the place of sympathizing with the victim.

When you think of secondary victims, they would be the family and friends who knew and loved London.   People who had no way to avoid thinking about how he died.  I know I can’t avoid it. I can’t avoid thinking of my own kid terrified and falling.

I wish news articles wouldn’t immediately jump on the disability (or disabilities) of the victim, like the first article I saw.  For London McCabe was autistic.  Nonverbal.

Facts about motive are very scarce right now.  There are indications that the mother suffered from some mental illness.  As a community we’ve seen that argument play out all too often as a “blame the victim” approach: it’s hard to raise an autistic child and the parent buckled under the pressure.  We’ve seen this approach used cynically.  That doesn’t preclude actual mental illness in this case.  We ask for equality in the treatment of those who kill in our community.  Equality means not throwing our friends in the mental illness community under the bus.  The disability of the victim is not an excuse.  It is not a mitigating factor.  Real mental illness is.  Let’s see what the facts are in this case.

London McCabe’s family is not ready to discuss the details, but has released this message at a prayer vigil:

We are deeply touched by the community outpouring of love and support for our family…The best way you can honor him and not let his death be in vein is to purpose in your hearts to respond in kindness, love and respect toward all those people in your lives especially those with special challenges…Don’t allow hatred, anger, bitterness, or revenge to fill your heart

By Matt Carey

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6 Responses to “London McCabe”

  1. amandasmills November 8, 2014 at 10:26 #

    Reblogged this on Nature Study in the City.

  2. lilady November 8, 2014 at 18:58 #

    One only need to imagine how London felt as he was tossed over the railing on that bridge and as the frigid water filled his lungs.

    London is dead and the one who killed him is alive.

    There is no excuse for murdering your child.

  3. reissd November 8, 2014 at 19:33 #

    Thank you for bringing this child back to the center, where he should be.

  4. Saraquill November 8, 2014 at 23:31 #

    How many of these murderous caretakers are inspired by reading about other homicidal carers, and the support they get?

    • Sullivan (Matt Carey) November 9, 2014 at 00:34 #

      One would be too many. And I think we can say it’s too many.

  5. dennis February 16, 2015 at 16:03 #

    Sounds like the ‘Tosser’ woke up to the reality: she was never going to get the perfect child she felt herself entitled to. Hence, she sought to retrieve what social capital (social brownie points) she could by murdering him.

    All autists are drains upon the social-dominance-body-politic as understood by the Normal (as in *perfect*) majority. While all deviance from perfection is treason (to the Normal mind) there is treason (e.g. poverty, disfigurement, illness, insufficient thin-ness, etc.) and there is T.R.E.A.S.O.N. – in short, there is a hierarchy of moral deficiency, and autists – especially those individuals who are able to ‘pass for Normal’ – are at or near the bottom of it.

    This treason is contagious, much as if this were the culture of the ancient Viking of a millenniu

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