Autism Speaks updates their mission statement. “Cure” is now gone

12 Oct

Stephen Shore alerted people on Facebook recently that change was coming to Autism Speaks. Stephen has now shown us that the mission statement has changed.

Here is the mission statement on the Autism Speaks website as it was in July:

At Autism Speaks, our goal is to change the future for all who struggle with an autism spectrum disorder.

We are dedicated to funding global biomedical research into the causes, prevention, treatments and a possible cure for autism. We strive to raise public awareness about autism and its effects on individuals, families, and society: and we work to bring hope to all who deal with the hardships of this disorder. We are committed to raising the funds necessary to support these goals.

Autism Speaks aims to bring the autism community together as one strong voice to urge the government and private sector to listen to our concerns and take action to address this urgent global health crisis. It is our firm belief that, working together, we will find the missing pieces of the puzzle.

Click the links to learn more about our leadership, our board of directors, our scientific boards and our family services committee.

Here is how it reads today:

Autism Speaks is dedicated to promoting solutions, across the spectrum and throughout the lifespan, for the needs of individuals with autism and their families through advocacy and support; increasing understanding and acceptance of autism spectrum disorder; and advancing research into causes and better interventions for autism spectrum disorder and related conditions.

Autism Speaks enhances lives today and is accelerating a spectrum of solutions for tomorrow.

As Stephen Mark Shore wrote on his Facebook page about the change: “Cure” has been replaced with advocacy, support, and acceptance through the lifespan.


By Matt Carey

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14 Responses to “Autism Speaks updates their mission statement. “Cure” is now gone”

  1. Judith October 13, 2016 at 15:35 #

    This makes more sense help and acceptance is what is needed right now. These comorbids must be dealt with. Autism Speaks can be a great cause without insulting people on the spectrum.

    Distinguishing between ASDs and other diagnoses can be challenging because the traits of ASDs often overlap with symptoms of other disorders and the characteristics of ASDs make traditional diagnostic procedures difficult.[5][6]

    Contents from wiki
    1
    Comorbid conditions
    1.1
    Anxiety
    1.2
    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
    1.3
    Bipolar disorder
    1.4
    Bowel disease
    1.5
    Developmental coordination disorder
    1.6
    Epilepsy
    1.7
    Fragile X syndrome
    1.8
    Gender dysphoria
    1.9
    Intellectual disability
    1.10
    Neuroinflammation and immune disorders
    1.11
    Nonverbal learning disorder
    1.12
    Obsessive-compulsive disorder
    1.13
    Tourette syndrome
    1.14
    Sensory problems
    1.15
    Tuberous sclerosis
    1.16
    Sleep disorders
    1.17
    Other mental disorders

  2. Sullivan (Matt Carey) October 16, 2016 at 04:16 #

    How can this make sense to you when your comment makes none?

    • Judith February 28, 2017 at 19:36 #

      “For instance, in the comment section of this topic on Left Brain Right Brain, that I’m sure is among your favorite medical blogs, you can read the comments of Judith. The completely illogical and idiotic way that Judith examines this problem is so stunning it needs to be quoted at length.” This is from an autism forum. My comment makes no sense because AS is no longer seeking a cure but what about all these comorbids? And what is autism anyway? no one wants a cure more than I do. I want a cure for every disability out there. Autism the disability is so complex that they can’t seem to pinpoint any one cause or treatment. Right now my kid has grown up and I don’t want to worry about him after I’m dead. (that makes no sense)

      • Sullivan (Matt Carey) February 28, 2017 at 21:51 #

        If you are having a discussion on some forum somewhere, perhaps you should be posting your responses there. I will usually participate in discussions that are part of what is written here, but I have no idea of the context of discussions elsewhere.

    • Judith February 28, 2017 at 22:53 #

      I don’t participate in other forums. I just read this post on another forum about me being idiotic. Then I read your reply that I make no sense. I got all those comorbids from Wikipedia. Thanks, but I just don’t have anything useful to say to anyone anywhere.

      • Sullivan (Matt Carey) March 1, 2017 at 17:51 #

        Sorry, I misunderstood your comment.

  3. Ronnie October 18, 2016 at 13:53 #

    In my view when I first discovered autism awareness maybe 18 years ago, it seemed to be all about children like a boy named Dov, who regressed or the Wright’s grandson who lost his ability to speak and others like my child. There was talk of a cure, talk about genetics and environment. There was talk of an epidemic. The only real hope was in the form of education and ABA. It was accepted by many that autism was a puzzle. Then came the reality that there was no epidemic, no need for a cure, that ABA was a cruel treatment for autism. Sensory issues and ID are not a part autism neither were seizures, ADHD and crying and wakefulness. There became what is known as “high or ” low” functioning.
    Understandably only 2% of those with autism have ID. They will never drive a car, get married, graduate from school, live independently. We still hope for happiness for them and the respect they deserve. Autism awareness was brought about by people like them. I don’t expect any response from my post because this is not the forum concerning such matters.

    • Sullivan (Matt Carey) October 23, 2016 at 03:47 #

      “Understandably only 2% of those with autism have ID”

      You are off by a factor of 20.

      “Wright’s grandson who lost his ability to speak”

      For what it’s worth, this is not the story put forth by Katie Wright. She says her son lost a lot of speech, but not all of it. But, then again, her story has changed over the years.

      • Judith October 24, 2016 at 03:32 #

        Thanks for your response. Sometimes I feel that life is unfair for someone I love but he is happy so no need to feel this way. The reason for posts with different names is because I thought the first didn’t go through somehow. Sorry. I like that you correct my misconceptions. If I don’t contribute to your discussions about science and autism then just tell me I am a fool and not to post anymore.

  4. Judith October 18, 2016 at 13:54 #

    In my view when I first discovered autism awareness maybe 18 years ago, it seemed to be all about children like a boy named Dov, who regressed or the Wright’s grandson who lost his ability to speak and others like my child. There was talk of a cure, talk about genetics and environment. There was talk of an epidemic. The only real hope was in the form of education and ABA. It was accepted by many that autism was a puzzle. Then came the reality that there was no epidemic, no need for a cure, that ABA was a cruel treatment for autism. Sensory issues and ID are not a part autism neither were seizures, ADHD and crying and wakefulness. There became what is known as “high or ” low” functioning.
    Understandably only 2% of those with autism have ID. They will never drive a car, get married, graduate from school, live independently. We still hope for happiness for them and the respect they deserve. Autism awareness was brought about by people like them. I don’t expect any response from my post because this is not the forum concerning such matters.

    • Judith October 18, 2016 at 16:53 #

      P.S. I should never say never as in living independently or driving a car or getting meaningful employment. I just wanted to mention that and the minority of those with autism who have the most challenges do matter and all are fully capable. I don’t want them to become invisible again.

    • Sullivan (Matt Carey) October 23, 2016 at 03:48 #

      Judith/Ronnie,

      pick one name. Make one post. I am not approving your third copy of this comment.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. A change in emphasis from Autism Speaks?  | Chic Gibson – A blog of sorts - October 13, 2016

    […] Autism Speaks updates their mission statement. “Cure” is now gone […]

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    […] previous mission statement of Autism Speaks was longer than the current one. However, it is the following paragraph of the […]

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