CDC Set To Release New Autism Numbers

16 Mar

Disability Scoop has an article: CDC Set To Release New Autism Numbers. This was posted last week, and it starts:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are expected to unveil a new autism prevalence estimate as early as this month.

The agency currently says that 1 in 110 children have autism, a figure first released in late 2009. Now, less than three years later, the CDC is set for an update.

I had heard rumors that the next prevalence estimate would be much higher. Not higher than the Korean prevalence numbers, but a significant jump. But–I heard these rumors together with the prediction that the estimate would come out last year. So, rumors are worth what you pay for them.

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5 Responses to “CDC Set To Release New Autism Numbers”

  1. Gedrene March 17, 2012 at 23:12 #

    No point trusting something that has sold out to autism speaks. How many autistic people does it take to prove that it’s the diagnosis that cause the most harm some of the time?

  2. passionlessDrone March 22, 2012 at 18:06 #

    Hello friends –

    I’d be interested in hearing anyone’s take on the rationale for a complaint you see in some circles regarding the shifting of which states are used to comprise these estimates on a report by report basis; i.e., report with NJ numbers four years ago, but not two years ago (or whatever the timeframes / years are).

    To my mind, I’m struggling to see how this is good practice; it would seem we could get better values by seeing every state, or the same states over time.

    Maybe someone out there has some insight on why providing data from a subset of states, and a different subset of states is a good idea, or at least not a bad idea. (?)

    – pD

    • Sullivan March 22, 2012 at 19:35 #

      pD–

      I’ll try to find out. Keep in mind, the monitoring sites are not CDC people. The CDC partners with groups in the states. CDC can’t force groups or researchers to stay in the network.

      Here is a list of members of the team from the 2009 report (looking at data from 2006, for kids born in 1998…it gets complicated fast!):

      Information in this report was provided by ADDM Network Surveillance Year 2004 and 2006 principal investigators: Beverly Mulvihill, PhD, Martha Wingate, PhD, University of Alabama, Birmingham; Russell S. Kirby, PhD, University of South Florida; Sydney Pettygrove, PhD, Chris Cunniff, MD, F. John Meaney, PhD, University of Arizona, Tucson; Lisa Miller, MD, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver; Cordelia Robinson, PhD, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Denver; Gina Quintana, Colorado Department of Education; Marygrace Yale Kaiser, PhD, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida; Li-Ching Lee, PhD, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; Rebecca Landa, PhD, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, Maryland; Craig Newschaffer, PhD, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; John Constantino, MD, Robert Fitzgerald, MPH, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri; Julie Daniels, PhD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Ellen Giarelli, EdD, Jennifer Pinto-Martin, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia: Susan E. Levy, MD, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Jane Charles, MD, Joyce Nicholas, PhD, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; Maureen Durkin, PhD, DrPH, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Catherine Rice, PhD, Jon Baio, EdS, Kim Van Naarden Braun, PhD, Marshalyn Yeargin-Allsopp, MD, Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC. Data collection was coordinated at each site by ADDM Network project coordinators: Meredith Hepburn, Neva Garner, University of Alabama, Birmingham; Kristen Clancy Mancilla, University of Arizona, Tucson; Andria Ratchford, MSPH, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver; Yolanda Castillo, MBA, Colorado Department of Education; Maria Kolotos, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; Rob Fitzgerald, MPH, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri; Paula Bell, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Rachel Meade, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Lydia King, PhD, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; Carrie Arneson, MS, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Anita Washington, MPH, Research Triangle Institute, Atlanta, Georgia; Susan Graham, MSPH, Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC. Additional assistance was provided by project staff including data abstractors, clinician reviewers, epidemiologists, and data management/programming support stff. Ongoing ADDM Network support was provided by Rita Lance, Northrup Grummon, contractor to CDC; Lori Plummer, Lekeisha Jones, Research Triangle Institute, contractors to CDC; Joanne Wojcik, Nancy Doernberg, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC.

      My guess it that they would like to have monitoring sites in all states, but that the cost is an issue. Even within each state they don’t survey everyone.

  3. Science Mom March 22, 2012 at 18:48 #

    pD, I can’t comment as I am not familiar with the collection methods but would be interested.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. cdc autism | Autism @ Top Information - April 14, 2012

    […] CDC Set To Release New Autism Numbers Disability Scoop has an article: CDC Set To Release New Autism Numbers. This was posted last week, and it starts: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are expected to unveil a new autism prevalence estimate as early as this month. Read more on Left Brain/Right Brain […]

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