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MMS, Miracle Mineral Solution, CD, Chlorine Dioxide…call it what you will, it’s abusive and it’s fake medicine

3 Jan

I’ve written a few times about MMS. Rather than the long articles on specific topics, I feel it’s appropriate to make a simple, short statement:

MMS, aka Miracle Mineral Solution, aka CD, aka chlorine dioxide is bogus. It’s junk. Worse than that, it’s abusive. Yes, you will find segments of the autism-parent community who promote and use it. But that doesn’t make it actually useful, nor does it make it OK to use.

Here’s the thing–it’s a bleach solution. The idea that this can work to “detoxify” or “kill parasites” is just flat out wrong.

The Autism Research Institute (ARI), a group which has promoted unproven alternative treatments for autism throughout its history, has this to say:

Given these issues, we advise against using MMS at this time. We hope parents will remain critical of unsubstantiated claims that children have recovered or greatly improved in the absence of objective proof. We also strongly encourage any parents who choose to administer MMS to their children to report it to their physician so that side effects can be monitored.

If a group such as ARI, a group favorable to alt-med, comes out with such a strong statement, you know it’s time to question the “scientific” claims and testimonials.

As to why I call this abusive? Used as an enema (one method strongly promoted by MMS activists) it causes people to pass the lining of their intestines. You can find pictures of these “worms” on the web, where people claim they have killed a parasite. (This is just the worst use of MMS. Taken orally it is still abusive).

Again, from the ARI:

The mucous threads that children expel during MMS treatment, which have been touted as worms (though laboratory analysis does not support this claim), are the body’s method of protecting itself from induced oxidative stress in the lower digestive tract equivalent to the mid-day sun in its ability to produce severe sunburn.

Seriously, what else can one call pushing chemicals into disabled children’s digestive tracts until they start passing tissues? Yes, parents subjecting their children to this are not doing so with the intent to abuse, but they are being fooled into a harmful act.

Since I keep getting commenters on this blog defending this practice, I felt the need to make this short and clear statement. MMS is bogus. It’s harmful.

Just don’t do it.

By Matt Carey

ABC to present “Wacky Church Under Fire Over ‘Miracle Cure’ for Autism”

27 Oct

MMS. Miracle Mineral Solution. CD. Chlorined Dioxide. Call it what you want, it’s a scam. Worse than that, it’s abusive. And thankfully it’s getting some national news attention.

ABC’s 20/20 will present on Friday, Wacky Church Under Fire Over ‘Miracle Cure’ for Autism

Here’s one section of the website for the news segment:

“They’ve got their own Facebook group. There are people admitting to using this stuff on their children. Children are experiencing symptoms,” Eggers said. “You are doing it at the expense of these defenseless children. How, how, how can you not call that evil?”

MMS/CD whatever you want to call it, is sold with a bunch of science-sounding mumbo-jumbo. Believe me (a Ph.D. scientist with 30 years of experience), the explanations given by people like Kerri Rivera and Jim Humble for what MMS does amount to science nonsense.

Thank you ABC for taking this on. Please don’t walk away from this story, keep on it. We need this abuse to end.

By Matt Carey

If MMS, CD, chlorine dioxide, “parasite protocol” is safe, why does ClO2 dissolve tissue?

15 Jan

One of the marketing ploys for MMS* is that it somehow attacks viruses, bacteria, parasites, heavy metals, toxins and more but doesn’t affect human tissue. It’s safe! Of course this is from the same people who said that it isn’t a bleach. Emily Willingham did a very simple and elegant demonstration that, MMS: Yes, It Is Bleach. Put a few drops on a black cloth and, lo an behold, it bleaches it.

photo+%25286%2529[1]

I thought about taking this to the next step–putting some drops on raw meat to see how much tissue would be bleached. Then I thought, I wonder if there’s a study on this already? Consider this paper, Comparison of Organic Tissue Dissolution Capacities of Sodium Hypochlorite and Chlorine Dioxide (full paper here).

Organic tissue dissolution capacity. In other words: how well do these solutions dissolve tissue.

According to the main site promoting MMS as an autism cure:

What is MMS?

MMS stands for Master Mineral Solution. It’s chemical name is Chlorine Dioxide (ClO2). ClO2 is a gas that is produced as a result of combining 2 liquids, Sodium Chlorite (NaClO2) and citric acid. When added to the sodium chlorite, the citric acid brings the combined pH level to under five, causing the sodium chlorite to become unstable and release chorine dioxide. (ClO2) Chlorine dioxide is an oxidizer with a lower oxidation potential (.95 V) than any of the other oxidizers in the human body.

MMS starts out as sodium chlorite, not the hypochlorite as mentioned in the paper. But the final solution contains ClO2, the same as one tested in the above paper. In that paper they were exploring whether these solutions (sodium hypochlorite and ClO2) could be used in dental work. They wanted to test whether ClO2 solutions would have an effect on tissue, in this case the pulp from the inside of teeth. They already knew that sodium hypochlorite dissolved tissue.

What did they find? When they put tooth pulp (taken from cows) into these solutions, after 20 minutes about 28% of the tissue was dissolved.

Dissolved.

In ClO2 solution.

But wait, you say. That’s a paper using cow teeth, published in Turkey. Realizing that this argument would come up, I searched for more papers. Such as Effect of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite on the dissolution of human pulp tissue e An in vitro study. Which concludes

5% Chlorine dioxide is capable of dissolving human pulp tissue but sodium hypochlorite was more effective.

Or

Comparison of Organic Tissue Dissolution Capacities of NaOCl and ClO2

Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it was concluded that ClO2 is efficient as well as NaOCl in dissolving organic tissue.

Not all tissues are the same. Skin, especially the dead skin in the outer layer, is likely more resistant than tooth pulp. But, how about the intestinal lining (a consideration for those using this as an enema solution)? Or once absorbed in the stomach (for those taking an oral route) or the esophagus?

OK, it dissolves tissues. But why go to these papers? How about just looking at the MSDS? People have long brought out the MSDS for thimerosal to tell us that it should be removed from vaccines. The MSDS for thimerosal shows that the LD50 level (the exposure where 1/2 of the test animals died, lethal dose 50) is Acute oral toxicity (LD50): 75 mg/kg [Rat] for thimerosal. A chlorine dioxide solution of 0.054 weight% Chlorine Dioxide is less toxic than thimerosal, with an LD50 (oral) rats: 292 mg/kg. So, it would take about 4 times as much chlorine dioxide solution at this concentration to kill a rat as thimerosal.

The thing is, people don’t drink thimerosal solutions. Or do so repeatedly. People are encouraged to drink MMS.

Consider what happens if we increase the concentration of ClO2. Up the concentration to 3% ClO2 in water and it is as toxic as thimerosal. But, again, dose makes the poison and the dose of ClO2 from MMS is much higher than the dose of thimerosal from a vaccine.

The idea that MMS, or CD or Chlorine Dioxide is somehow a magical solution which rids the body of harmful substances while having no effect on human tissues is just flat out incorrect. It dissolves organic tissue. It’s toxic and the doses are significant.

(*MMS is “miracle mineral solution”, a relatively new bit of alternative medicine that is being sold as an autism cure. It has been promoted at parent conventions such as Autism One and by the blog The Age of Autism. It is a scam and if the discussion above wasn’t clear: it should be avoided.)


By Matt Carey

Yes, it may be illegal to sell MMS

14 Jan

A few years ago a new “treatment” appeared in the alternative medical world: MMS or Miracle Mineral Solution. As just criticism came out on this treatment, the name has morphed. One can now find it called CD (chlorine dioxide) or CDS (chlorine dioxide solution) or even the “parasite protocol). It goes by many names and it’s a scam. It is a well marketed scam and it’s taken in a lot of smart people. If you haven’t heard of it before you may be wondering what it is. Essentially, it’s a bleach (sodium chlorite) which is supposed to be mixed with a weak acid to make another bleach (chlorine dioxide). There are some effective marketing materials posing as scientific talks that use the classic alt-med sales techniques: testimonials and science-like discussions. In the autism world, this means claiming that it makes autistic kids non-autistic. Usually they avoid the “c” word (cure) because that is a quick way to get noticed by the people who are supposed to protect us from such scams.

MMS is sold often with a wink and a nod as a water purification solution. Such appears to be the case with a team charged with defrauding regulators and the sale of MMS as a cure or treatment. Per the press release below, it seems that this U.S. based team was importing their materials from Canada. At some point they “smuggled sodium chlorite into the United States from Canada using fraudulent invoices to hide the true end use of the product. In these invoices, according to the indictment, they falsely claimed that the ingredients they were purchasing for MMS were to be used in wastewater treatment facilities.” Their website shows them selling 4 ounce bottles of the solution. It would take a lot of those bottles to supply a wastewater treatment facility.

Here’s a point I haven’t seen made about MMS. One can purchase the base material, sodium chlorite, for about 50 cents a pound. Alibaba shows the liquid selling for $100-300 per metric ton. (click to enlarge)

Alibaba Sodium Chlorite

But, let’s look at the website of this team selling the sodium chlorite solution. For only $20 you could get a 4-ounce bottle. That’s a savings of $5 off the regular price! Anyone want to do the calculations of how many 4-ounce bottles could be filled with a metric ton purchased for a few hundred dollars?

If one doesn’t want a ton shipped from China, Canada (where this team was sourcing their material) has sellers selling seven pound jars of the solid for $200. Not as big a profit margin as buying by the ton, but still a notable markup.

pgl

The “project green life” team point out that they are selling it as a water purification product only. If, by chance, you are planning on doing the “MMS protocol” they will provide you with information “for your safety and convenience”. And just in case, they have a one-stop shop in that they will sell you the second part of the MMS protocol, citric acid.

pgl2

Wink. Nod. It’s just a water purification product, right? Sold at a huge profit. And for a small additional fee, one could also get the second part of the MMS product.

Apparently after this one team had their production facility inspected by the FDA, they moved production on to the property of one of their team members. There’s a silicon valley legend about companies starting in garages. It’s one thing for making electronics or computers. It’s another thing when we are talking about something sold (even with the wink) for human consumption.

Here is the press release from the Justice Department about when the charges were made.

Louis Daniel Smith, 42, and Karis Delong, 38, both of Ashland, Ore., were charged with defrauding regulators and suppliers in a scheme to manufacture and sell industrial bleach as a cure for numerous illnesses, including arthritis, cancer, and the seasonal flu. Also charged were Chris Olson, 49, and Tammy Olson, 50, of Nine Mile Falls, Wash. A federal grand jury returned an indictment, unsealed yesterday, charging Smith, Delong and Tammy Olson with one count of conspiracy, four counts of interstate sales of misbranded drugs, and one count of smuggling. The grand jury charged Chris Olson with one count of conspiracy, one count of the interstate sale of a misbranded drug and one count of smuggling.

The indictment alleges that Smith and Delong operated a business called “Project GreenLife” (PGL) from 2004 to 2011. PGL provided various health products for sale over the internet. According to the indictment, Smith and Delong arranged the manufacture and sale of the “Miracle Mineral Supplement” (MMS), a mixture of Sodium Chlorite and water. Sodium chlorite is not meant for human consumption. Suppliers of the chemical include a warning sheet with the chemical that states that it is harmful if swallowed.

According to the indictment, PGL provided consumers directions to combine MMS with citric acid to create Chlorine Dioxide, and the instructions told consumers to drink this mixture to cure numerous illnesses. Chlorine Dioxide is a potent agent used to bleach textiles, among other industrial applications. In humans, Chlorine Dioxide is a severe respiratory and eye irritant that can cause nausea, diarrhea and dehydration.

As part of the scheme to manufacture MMS, the indictment alleges that Smith, Delong, and others smuggled sodium chlorite into the United States from Canada using fraudulent invoices to hide the true end use of the product. In these invoices, according to the indictment, they falsely claimed that the ingredients they were purchasing for MMS were to be used in wastewater treatment facilities.

According to the charging documents, Smith and Delong were the managing members of PGL Smith co-founded the company, and Delong frequently handled financial transactions for the company and recruited friends and family to participate in the business. The indictment alleges that Smith and Delong paid Tammy Olson to handle all customer inquiries regarding the product. It is alleged that Tammy Olson continued selling MMS on her own website after federal agents shut down the Project GreenLife website and production facilities.

The indictment also alleges that Smith and Delong paid Chris Olson to clandestinely manufacture MMS in a building on his property after regulators from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) inspected PGL’s original manufacture and shipping locations.

“The Department of Justice is committed to protecting the health and safety of people with cancer and other serious medical conditions,” said Stuart F. Delery, Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department’s Civil Division. “Our most vulnerable citizens need real medicine – not dangerous chemicals peddled by modern-day snake oil salesmen.”

Charges contained in the indictment are simply accusations, and not evidence of guilt. Evidence supporting the charges must be presented to a federal trial jury, whose duty it is to determine guilt or innocence.

The case was investigated by agents of the FDA’s Office of Criminal Investigations and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service. The case is being prosecuted by Christopher E. Parisi, a Trial Attorney at the Department of Justice’s Consumer Protection Branch in Washington, D.C.

The defendants have made a number of motions and at least one appears to be defending himself (filing pro se). Here’s an example of one such motion:

In his motion to strike for lack of standing, ECF No. 37, Mr. Smith disputes whether the “United States” and the “United States of America” are “legally one and the same.”

I’d want a real attorney if I were a part of this group, but that’s me.


By Matt Carey

Globanews.ca reports:Health Canada seizes dangerous health product

20 Oct

The article is very short but the news is good–Health Canada has gone beyond issuing warnings about MMS (also known as CD protocol, CDS, Chlorine Dioxide Solution, Magic Mineral Solution). They have seized the product from one supplier:

According to Health Canada, MMS contains sodium chlorite, which is used as a textile bleaching agent and disinfectant. An alternate form of MMS, which is called CDS, is also being sold on the same web site. It would have the same risks associated with it as MMS.

Health Canada has now seized the product since sodium chlorite is not approved for human consumption.

If you have been using the product, it is recommended you stop immediately and go see your doctor.

MMS is a scam, plain and simple. And a dangerous scam. More discussion of it can be found at the Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism in: Dangerous Interventions: MMS and Autism by Emily Willingham, Ph.D..


By Matt Carey

Since bleach wasn’t enough, let’s start adding hydrochloric acid to MMS?

27 Aug

MMS. Miracle Mineral Solution is dangerous bunk. They’ve taken such a hit with people exposing it as bunk that they’ve started rebranding themselves as “CD” of “Chlorine Dioxide”.

The basic idea is that there are bad things inside you that make you sick. And by sick, they include autistic. If you ingest something that kills the bad things, or take enemas that kill the bad things, you will no longer be sick. There’s a lot of handwaving about how this only works on the bad things and not the good things like, say, the tissues in your body.

It’s nonsense. Dangerous nonsense.

MMS stands for Miracle Mineral Solution. It’s not a miracle. It’s not a mineral. It is a solution made by combining two other solutions to get chlorine dioxide in solution. The two starter solutions are sodium chlorite (a powerful bleach) and citric acid.

Well if citric acid is “good”, how can we make it “better” some have asked?

A New Simpler MMS: CDH – Chlorine Dioxide Holding (01-04-2014)

Here’s what they say:

While CDS has no raw materials left in the final product, CDH does, making it similar to classic MMS. The main difference between classic MMS and CDH, however, is that the sodium chlorite is allowed to react with the acid for a much longer period of time which reduces the amount of unactivated sodium chlorite and activator left in the final CDH solution. Then, since CDH is more fully activated outside of the body, it causes little or no stomach upset in most people. Also, CDH made with 4% HCl tastes much better. (Note: For those who still have a problem with the taste, “Sweetleaf” brand liquid stevia has been tested and is compatible with MMS, thus can be used to make it taste even better.)

If you took high school or college chemistry you probably remember the very sharp aroma of HCl. You may remember how it can burn skin and the lining of your nose. It’s nasty stuff. Sure, they’ve got relatively dilute HCl (4%), but, still, WHAT ARE THEY THINKING? (and after that–people are looking at 10% HCl! There is something seriously wrong here)

MMS/CD/CDH, whatever you want to call this, it’s a scam. People post to Facebook pictures of the intestinal linings of their disabled kids, passed with the help of MMS enemas. They caption these pictures with statements about how MMS killed “worms”. Rather than go to a doctor and see if there are real parasites, they are self-diagnosing and self-treating and causing harm.

One of the main avenues for promoting this to the autism community is the AutismOne parent convention, where MMS pracitioner Terri Kerri Riviera sells her services under the guise of “scientific” presentations.

And all the people presenting at AutismOne stand by and don’t say a word. The supposed leaders in that community don’t seem to have the ability to spot scam artists (which is pretty obvious given the years they have spent promoting Andrew Wakefield, to give just one example). They also lack courage. They rarely if ever stand up to anyone who is promoting obvious and dangerous nonsense.

The all show up, promote themselves, their goods and services, and go home. It’s time for them to show some courage. They can put a stop to this. Instead they lend their names and credibility to this obvious scam.


By Matt Carey


By Matt Carey

MMS, now trying to scam the Irish

15 Jul

MMS. Magical Mineral Solution. CD. Chlorine Dioxide protocol. It has many names. And it’s a scam. Hiding behind a “church”. And now the Irish get to battle this.

Magic Mineral Solution isn’t magic and it isn’t a mineral solution. It’s a bleach. And among the various scams is the idea that if you force your autistic kid to drink this bleach or take this bleach as an enema, you can cure your child’s autism.

The Irish Examiner has a story: ‘Miracle solution can cure autism’. It’s about how the proprietor of the “church” that is pushing MMS telling an Irish mother that it is a “fact” that MMS can cure autism….and asking for a hefty donation.

When Ms O Leary asked if MMS “could really cure autism”, she alleges Mr Christopher replied it was not a possibility but a fact — a claim also made about numerous conditions on the Genesis II Church website.

Ms O Leary was then sent an email, giving directions to the seminar, and asking her for a €295 donation.

And also:

In 2012, after three hospital admissions and other incidents linked to MMS, Dr Naren Gunja of New South Wales’ Poisons Information Centre in Australia told the Sydney Morning Herald: “It’s a bit like drinking concentrated bleach. They’ve had corrosive injuries: vomiting, stomach pains, diarrhoea.

“If you drink enough sodium chlorite it causes kidney problems, it could cause death.”

By the way, if someone tells you that MMS isn’t a bleach, yeah, it’s a bleach. Calling it “CD” doesn’t change that.

And if they say it’s safe, they are wrong. If they say it cures autism. Run. Here’s a bit from a recent FDA warning:

•Miracle Mineral Solution. Also known as Miracle Mineral Supplement and MMS, this product becomes a potent chemical that‘s used as bleach when mixed according to package directions. FDA has received reports of consumers who say they experienced nausea, severe vomiting and life-threatening low blood pressure after drinking the MMS and citrus juice mixture.

Irish Central has: Irish warned of poisonous ‘miracle cure’ being peddled by US church (VIDEO). I feel both sad that we in the U.S. didn’t stop this nonsense before it exported to Ireland…and jealous that the Irish and their newspapers are quick to spread the word about MMS.

And, back at the Irish Examiner: Drugs watchdog investigating ‘miracle’ cure.

Ireland’s drugs watchdog is investigating at least two people based in this country who are believed to be selling or administering a “miracle” cure for serious conditions, which is in reality a potent bleach.

The Irish Independent: Irish patients warned ‘miracle cure’ from US church is bleach. And the Southern Star has Warning about Genesis II Church.

MMS got it’s foothold in the autism community through the AutismOne conferences. Here in the U.S., gatherings like AutismOne sell all manner of faux therapies for autism. AutismOne will take just about anyone’s money to present a cure, especially if it is sold as healing “vaccine injury”.

So, with apologies to Ireland. We know this is a scam, but we can’t stop it here. I wish you better luck. Be grateful that your press has jumped to inform you. Our press is still trying to figure out if keeping disabled children from being forced to drink bleach is a worthwhile story.


By Matt Carey

MMS, yeah, it’s bleach

11 Jan

Last year the AutismOne parent convention hosted a talk by someone promoting MMS as a treatment for autism. MMS is a bleach. But MMS supporters and defenders rush to discussions of MMS with claims that it is not a bleach and calling it a bleach is fear mongering.

Only, it is a bleach. As in, apply it to cloth and the color goes away. Don’t believe me? Check out MMS: Yes, It Is Bleach, an article by Emily Willingham at The Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism.

What has become of Autism Science Digest?

26 Dec

Autism Science Digest was an effort by AutismOne to publish their take on autism science in a magazine format for a general audience. AutismOne is best known for their annual parent convention which focused largely on alternative medicine and vaccine causation.

It is about the time that AutismOne should be publishing their speaker list for next year’s conference so I checked their website. For those interested, the speaker list reads like most past lists.  Andrew Wakefield, the former researcher who promoted the idea that the MMR vaccine causes autism, will speak. So will Keri Rivera, who last year gathered much criticism for promoting forcing disabled children to ingest bleach or undergo bleach laced enemas. Interestingly, neither Mark nor David Geier are on the list. The Geiers have been frequent speakers at AutismOne and other venues favorable to their failed ideas about mercury in vaccines causing autism, as well as bizarre proposals that using drugs to shut down sex hormone production can be used to treat autism.  While not a regular at AutismOne, Luc Montagnier will not make a return visit.  Last year Dr. Montagnier brought the prestige of a Nobel Laureate to the convention. While his presence was touted strongly by supporters of AutismOne, Dr. Montagnier’s ideas were lacking the scientific rigor one might expect from a Nobel laureate (to put it mildly). Of course Jenny McCarthy returns, perhaps to tell us all once again that those who don’t follow her ideas wish for our children to remain disabled so we can bask in the sympathy of our acquaintances.

That all said, while perusing the AutismOne website I noted that the cover for their “Autism Science Digest” hadn’t changed since my last visit.  That was some time ago. The cover informs readers about the then upcoming 2012 AutismOne convention (last April), so my interest was piqued and I checked the page for the “Digest” and found this announcement: Autism Science Digest is temporarily unavailable.

One is left wondering how “temporary” temporary is in this case. Autism Science Digest was launched in August 2011 so the lifespan (should temporary=permanent) seems a bit short.


By Matt Carey

From defense of MMS to attacks

21 Jun

When I first heard of Miracle Mineral Solution (aka MMS) and it’s presentation at AutismOne, I thought that here was something so obviously bad in both theory and execution that pretty much anyone who took a critical look would agree: why is this faux therapy being promoted?

Paint me naive.

I thought that AutismOne might actually reconsider their promotion of giving bleach to disabled children.

Paint me naive again.

I thought that perhaps the Age of Autism blog would stay away from this, allowing it to sink into the past. The best I’ve seen so far is a non-pology from Kim Stagliano:

“AofA isn’t endorsing the protocol or slamming it – just providing perspective via one of our wonderful contributors.”

About par for the course.

While I am naive, I will say that I did expect that there would be a core of MMS users who would not take kindly to the discussion. And in this I am not surprised. Apparently, “investigative journalist” Kelly Stone has submitted a response to Todd Drezner’s Huffington Post article The Curious Case of Autism and MMS. I assume this is intended for the Huffington Post to publish. If so, Ms. Stone may be in for disappointment.

Ms. Stones’ response is on an MMS discussion forum.

Huffington Post – Negative Exposure

Todd Drezner’s “A Curious Case of Autism Exploitation”

By Kelly Stone

Investigative Journalist

In it Ms. Stone takes the attack on Mr. Drezner right away

Signature contributor to the Huffington Post, Todd Drezner, takes ‘blogging for dollars’ to a whole new level with his latest post on Autism. Drezner’s online column is little more than a clever marketing effort for his self-directed documentary, “Loving Lampposts: Living Autistic”.

Yes. It’s all supposedly about Mr. Drezner making money from his movie “Loving Lamppoosts“.

As an aside, Ms. Stone seems to have difficulty with the concept of what a director is in film-making. The term “self-directed” is very odd in this context.

After introducing and attacking Mr. Drezner, Ms. Stone then takes on attacking Emily Willingham, Ph.D..

Willingham, known elsewhere as “Daisy May Fatty Pants” is a contributor to “A Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism”. – According to the Child Health Safety blog, Willingham is a “self-professed scientist with selective blindness to basic observations”. All too à propos, Drezner and Willingham team up in their petition to denounce chlorine dioxide therapy as “child abuse”, a sobering case of irony given it could be the very thing its signers have been looking for.

Ms. Stone, investigative journalist, is welcome to do just a little more digging than the junk blogs she’s read and discover that Emily Willingham is much more than a “self-professed” scientist. A simple google search (which I assume Ms. Stone did, then ignored the results) will quickly get one to http://www.emilywillinghamphd.com/. Her biography includes:

I have been a dedicated writer since about 1972 and practicing science since 1996. My background, as I say in cover letters, includes a bachelor’s degree in English and a PhD in biological sciences, both from The University of Texas at Austin, with a completed postdoctoral fellowship in pediatric urology at the University of California, San Francisco. Throughout, my focus was vertebrate development and genetics, specifically how gonads and penises develop. Talking about my work has always carried a frisson of the risque.

I’ve seen Ms. Willingham’s publication list. It is impressive. Which is just one point of many which can be used to say: Emily has the chops to call herself a scientist. Frankly if you don’t follow her writing, I’d recommend you do. (Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism and Biology Files are two good places to see her work).

Ms. Stone, investigative journalist, moves into defending MMS. First she pulls a quote from a US Patent. Notably, I only find references to this patent on (a) patent search sites and (b) MMS sites. Ms. Stone appears to have not done much investigation.

Here is her discussion of the patent:

However, based upon clinical research, a 1993 U.S. Patent (No. 6086922) states the following facts about sodium chlorite and chlorine dioxide:

“It is therefore quite unexpected that, with an intravenous administration of an appropriate chlorite matrix in the appropriate concentration, HIV viruses can be directly combated in the blood… The chlorite matrix solutions of the present invention also do not exhibit adverse effects such as severe cytotoxic damage and the like, typically associated with highly toxic chemicals which are administered intravenously [i.e. vaccines]. The chlorite matrix solutions of the present invention further are capable of inactivating the HIV virus to thereby inhibit infection of undamaged cells.”

Wow! Did you read that? Chlorine dioxide, via sodium chlorite (aka “MMS”), is effective at “combating”, “inactivating”, and “inhibiting” HIV, without any “adverse effects”. Why doesn’t your doctor know about this? I have a few ideas, but let’s put that aside and stick with the facts.

Let’s put that sentence from the patent back into context, shall we. And emphasize a few points while we do:

However, the use of chlorite solutions for parenteral administration typically was not thought to be possible because of their extraordinary toxicity.

It is therefore quite unexpected that, with an intravenous administration of an appropriate chlorite matrix in the appropriate concentration, HIV viruses can be directly combatted in the blood, demonstrated by the rapid and strong decrease of the viruses detectable in the blood.

First notice that the [i.e. vaccines] was added by Ms. Stone or someone else. Second, notice that the inventor notes that these solutions have “extraodinary toxicity”, but by chosing the “appropriate concentration” they can find a solution which they think is viable.

Appropriate concentration. Sounds a lot like “dose makes the poison”, right?

How does one chose the “appropriate concentration” of MMS? By upping the dose until the subject is obviously sickened. From the MMS handout for AutismOne

Weird things can happen when we begin using MMS

The immune system wakes up and sometimes we find the body detoxing an old cold, flu or rash. It is common to find that the child gets a fever. This is good.

There is so much pseudo-science in that statement it is difficult to imagine someone presenting that with a straight face. No evidence that the fever is due to “detoxing an old cold” or the other nonsense.

Ms. Rivera even has a slide devoted to “Fever Therapy with MMS”, essentially telling parents to dose their kids until they have a fever reaction.

One need only do a simple internet search for MMS and nausea to see that this is a common and expected reaction to MMS. Some people try to paint this nausea as a “good sign” as well.

Back to Ms. Stone. And the patent she cites to defend the use of Chlorine Dioxide. Here’s another section of that patent:

A significant inhibition of a new infection is found in vitro even at concentrations of 5 micro-mo1/l, whereas a concentration of 150 micro-mo1/l brings about a practically complete inhibition. However, concentrations of more than 100 ,micro-mo1/l can, over a prolonged period of time, lead to cytotoxic damage. Thus, concentrations of from 10 to 100, preferably of from about 40 to 80 and especially of 50 micro-mo1/l are preferred.

So, the dose described in the patent is chosen to avoid cytotoxic damage. They can’t reach the concentrations needed for complete inhibition of HIV due to this limit.

Apparently, investigative reporter Kelly Stone didn’t read the full patent as she makes the blanket statement:

OK, so sodium chlorite and chlorine dioxide are relatively safe to use intravenously, but what about oral ingestion, is that safe? A very good question; one Drezner might have thought to research.

I guess it depends on your definition of “relatively safe”.

When considering the value of this patent, keep this in mind. There’s an old saying: patents don’t have to be correct, they have to be novel. (think of Andrew Wakefield’s vaccine patent for an example of an idea which wouldn’t work but was patented). When was the last time, or only time, you heard someone talk about treating HIV patients with IV bleach?

If you are like me, the answer is never. The invention appears to have never been used. Well, never used except to defend MMS.

As an aside–another of the arguments has been, “of course Big Pharma would downplay this. They can’t patent it and make money off of it”. Then why did Oxo Chemie of Switzerland patent this?

In her attempt to paint Todd Drezner as a profit-driven Ms. Stone quotes from Mr. Drezner’s documentary:

“Autism is a gift disguised as a dilemma”, a profound take-away from Drezner’s documentary; but rest assured Drezner’s film isn’t a “gift” to the Autism community. No, you’ll have to buy the DVD, or have a paid Netflix account to watch it.

That’s exactly the kind of propaganda the medical-industrial complex can really get behind. Build your world around Autism! Accept it, don’t fix it! To quote the documentary, “You ‘cure’ hams… and ‘treat’ people.” This is the standard medical line. There’s no money in curing, only in perpetual treatment… well, that and selling DVDs.

Actually, you can see the segments she discusses online. And in those segments you can see that the comments are not made by Mr. Drezner. “Autism is a gift disguised as a dilemma” and “You ‘cure’ hams… and ‘treat’ people.” are quotes from Sharisa Kochmeister, autistic adult featured in Loving Lampposts.

It’s rather a stretch for the author to claim that Ms. Kochmeister is somehow involved in profiting from the lack of an autism cure.

This article is already rather long so rather than go on point by point in response to Ms. Stone’s attack, I’ll skip to the end of her piece:

Much unlike Drezner, we will be contacting the parents of the children that have reportedly made significant improvements using MMS, and we are currently collecting case by case clinical data showing MMS does what those singing its praises claim.

The thought crossed my mind; who’s underwriting Drezner, someone with ties to the FDA or Big Pharma? In a huge effort to not allow myself to be given over to absolute speculation like Drezner, I will wait and report my findings when they become factual.

Surprised by this conclusion? Both the “we have anecdotes” claim and the “pharma shill” gambit, with the “I’m more open minded because while I am attacking him, I’ll reserve final judgement until I have evidence” approach.

Would that she applied the same reasoning to MMS. As in waiting for evidence. Not anecdotes, evidence. How about at least something speaking more to biological plausibility. Again, paint me naive. The website she works for has already defended MMS using the anecdote defense.

Ms. Stone writes for the US~Observer. My strong suspicion is that her article will end up there with a complaint that even the Huffington Post wouldn’t take her article. But, we are talking about the Huffington Post. I’ve been caught being naive before.